75 Years Ago from the Archives.

75 Years ago from the Operation Record Books for
R.A.F. Station  Harrowbeer

 

November  1943

Wing Commander J. Butterworth is the Commanding Officer for R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer. The Station Operation Record Book for November was signed by Squadron J. M. Littler.

 

Visitors to R.A.F. Harrowbeer included :-

          Lieutenant Colonel Hassel  -  Group Defence Officer for No.23 Group

          Flight Lieutenant Cleasby  -  Liaison Officer

          Wing Commander R. H. Haworth-Booth DFC  -  President for District Court Martial

          Squadron Leader L. J. L. Pullar MC  -  Member for District Court Martial

         Flight Lieutenant H. J. Holland  -  Member for District Court Martial

          Squadron Leader B. H. Bowring  -  Member for District Court Martial

          Flight Lieutenant C. P. Barrett  -  Waiting Member for District Court Martial

          Squadron Leader W. M. Andrew  -  Judge Advocate for District Court Martial

          Air Commodore Russell  -  Air Officer Commanding No.70 Group

          The Hon. Herman Hodge  -  Colonial Office

          Squadron Leader Fenwick  -  No.73 Maintenance Unit

          Lieutenant Colonel Ronaldo-Carvalho  -  Brazilian Mission Member

          Captain Hamlet Estelle  -  Brazilian Mission Member

          Captain Henrique Perra  -  Brazilian Mission Member

          Captain Alphonse Arujcosta  -  Brazilian Mission Member

          Flight Lieutenant Dickinson  -  Public Relation Officer for the Air Ministry

          Pilot Officer Prettyman  -  Air Ministry ( Interpreter )

          Dr. Kipping  -  Command Chemical Warfare Advisor

          Wing Commander Godfrey  -  Air Ministry

          Squadron Leader Johnston  -  R.A.F. Station Exeter

 

Weather

          1st November     A poor start to the day. Bad weather resulting in no flying from the Station. Rain for most of the day with low cloud.

          2nd November     Another miserable day. Weather u/s all morning, by 1400 hours the weather had clamped down completely but started to clear in the late P.M.

          3rd November     Yet another " Harrowbeer " day, weather u/s all day. Bags of rain and much low cloud, with a haze at night right down on the deck. Although the rain eventually stopped for a period in the afternoon the weather remained u/s for flying until after dusk when it gradually cleared for a spell.

          4th November     A fairly good morning with good visibility.

          5th November     The day opens with poor weather again, 10/10 low cloud.

          6th November     Today the weather was much better with fairly bright patches.

          7th November     A fairly good day, although there was a lot of cloud about at two thousand feet and intermittent rain showers, visibilty was moderate.

          8th November     A filthy day with rain and thick fog right down on the deck with visibility thirty to forty yards, sometimes even less than that.     Even the sturdy moorland ponies " gave up "the main road round the Aerodrome today with a view no doubt to finding somewhere they could at least see the grass they were standing on. To stay around ' Harrowbeer ' on a day such as this a keen sense of smell is of more importance than good eyesight to anyone. In the late afternoon the weather began to clear gradually, although u/s for flying until well after last light.

          9th November     Quite satisfactory start to the day, fair periods throughout with 6/10 cloud.

          10th November     Another favourable morning. Visibility was fair with 8/10 cloud most of the day.

          11th November     A beautiful morning with scattered high cloud and good visibility.

          12th November     A hopeless morning, bags of haze, 10/10 cloud and rain. As the day progressed the weather remained duff, apart from one short bright interval followed by another clamp down.

          13th November     More heavy rain, high winds and thick cloud. The weather was cold and remained duff making flying impossible.

          14th November     A fairly cold bright start to the morning followed by heavy rainstorms from 0930 hours until 1000 hours. Gales were blowing from time to time throughout the day.

          15th November     Another cold but fairly good morning with occasional showers, 5/10 cloud and rather bumpy in the air.

          16th November     A typical cold November morning, clear with much frost. Visibilty was good.

          17th November     A favourable morning today with good visibilty again.

          18th November     Another reasonable day with the weather. Visibilty rated as fair to good.

          19th November     A moderate day. Visibilty was fair improving to good as the day progressed.

          20th November     Today was back to the duff weather again. Lots of rain showers and low cloud, visibilty was poor but improving throughout the day.

          21st November     Yet another ropey day. Heavy rain later in the day with poor visibilty, deteriorating as the day progressed.

          22nd November     Today was a bit better, a fairly good day although there was considerable scattered 10/10 cloud about at times with a spot of rain. Visibility was fair to good.

          23rd November     Another fairly reasonable morning, but still a lot of cloud coming down to the hills with occasional showers.

          24th November     A moderate start to the day with lots of low cloud but gradually closing in. By 1300 hours the weather had clamped down entirely and heavy rainstorms were experienced from then on.

          25th November     A most pleasant change with practically no cloud and excellent visibility.

          26th November      A favourable day, fair with cloud increasing to 8/10.

          27th November     The weather is back to being duff again, cold with 10/10 cloud and bad visibility.

          28th November     A hopeless day again 10/10 cloud and heavy rain. The weather remains duff until last light, lots of heavy mist about.

          29th November     Today was a much better morning, although a very strong wind was blowing over the Aerodrome. There was 8/10 cloud but visibilty was poor.

          30th November     Another fairly good morning although there was a considerable haze in broken patches, again 8/10 cloud with fair to good visibility.

 

From the Station O.R.B.

November has been an uneventful month with little of interes from the Station point of view.

          1st November     Flying Officer Craven-Ellis reported for duty today on posting. She assumes command of the W.A.A.F. Section.

          4th November     Lieutenant Colonel Hassell - the Group Defence Officer of No.23 Group visited the Station for a conference with the Local Defence Advisor.

          6th November     Thirty two Air Training Cadets and two Officers of No.1322 Squadron visited the Station on a night visit accompanied by Flight Lieutenant Cleaseby - Liaison Officer. The Sector Commander also paid a visit.

          7th November     Thirty Air Training Cadets and one Officer of No.507 Squadron spent the day at the Station. Luckily the weather was fair and it was found possible to give all members of both Squadrons ' air experience '.

          9th November     The trial by District Court Martial of an airman at R.A.F. Harrowbeer on five different charges commenced today. The composition of the Court was as follows :-

                      President :- Wing Commander R. H. Haworth-Booth DFC

                                Members :- Squadron Leader L. J. L. Pullar M.C.

                                                  Flight Lieutenant H. J. Holland

                                                  Squadron Leader B. H. Bowring

                      Waiting Member :- Flight Lieutenant C. P. Barrett

                      Judge Advocate :- Squadron Leader W. M. Andrew

          10th November     The District Court Martial concluded.

          11th November     Armistice Day Anniversary - no special parades or celebrations.

          17th November     The Hon. Herman Hodge of the Colonial Office visited the Station and was entertained by No.266 ( Rhodesia ) Squadron.

          22nd November     Squadron Leader Fenwick from No.73 Maintenance Unit visited the Station.     A Brazillion Mission visited the Station and were suitably entertained by the Station Commander and the Commanding Officer and members of No.193 ( Bellows of Brazil ) Squadron. The Mission consisted of the following Officers :-

                    Lieutenant Colonel Renaldo-Carvalho

                    Captain Hamlet Estelle

                    Captain Henrique Perra

                    Captain Alphonse Arjucosta

They were escorted by Flight Lieutenant Dickinson - ( Public Relations Officer for the Air Ministry ) and Pilot Officer Prettyman - ( attached to the Air Ministry ), the latter acting as interpreter to the party.     No.193 ( Bellows of Brazil ) Squadron laid on a very interesting programme for the visitors, including some spectacular aerobatics by the Squadron Commander, and a fly-past of the whole Squadron as well as social entertainment in the Messand elsewhere.

          23rd November    The Brazilian Mission departed well pleased with the arrangemants made for their edification.

          24th November     No.2891 Squadron R.A.F. Regiment left for Filey on training duties.

          25th November     A " live " Gas Practice ( decontaminating an aircraft ) using a mustard gas bomb took place on the airfield and was attended by Dr. Kipping ( Command Chemical Warfare Advisor ) and a number of local A.R.P. Authorities and others. No casualties were sustained.

          30th November     Squadron Leader Johnston from R.A.F. Exeter visited the Station Armament Officer.

 

Appendix  ' A '

 

Court Martial of a R.A.F. Harrowbeer Airman

 

The airman was tried by District Court Martial at R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer on Tuesday and Wednesday the 9th and 10th November 1943 on five charges :-

1st Charge     Section 41 Air Force Act

In that he at R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer fraudulently converted to his own use and benefit certain property, that is to say, the sum of £6.2.5 ( six pounds and twelve and a half pence ) received by him for and on account of the Officer in Charge of the Commanding Officer's Benevolent Fund.

2nd Charge     ( Alternative to 1st Charge ) Section 40 Air Force Act.

In that he at R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer having received the sum of £6.2.5 for and on account of the Officer in charge of the Commanding Officer's Benevolent Fund neglected as it was his duty to pay the said Officer the sum of money before leaving the said Station on posting.

3rd Charge     Section 41 Air Force Act

In that he at R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer fraudulently converted to his own use and benefits certain property, that is to say the sum of £5.13.3 ( five pounds and sixty seven pence ) received by him for and on account of the Officer in Charge of The Commanding Officer's Benevolent Fund.

4th Charge     Section 41 Air Force Act

In that he at R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer fraudulently converted to his own use and benefit, that is to say, the sum of £2.2.0 ( two pounds and ten pence ) entrusted to him by another airman in order that he, the accused might apply the same towards purchasing a parting present for an airman.

5th Charge     Section 40 Air Force Act

In that he at R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer improperly caused subscriptions to be collected from R.A.F. Personnel at the said Station for the purpose of purchasing a parting present for an airman.

          The Court found the accused Not Guilty on the 2nd charge, but Guilty of the 1st, 3rd, 4th and 5th charges. He was sentenced to be ( 1 ) reduced to the ranks and ( 2 ) to undergo detention for 112 days.

~     ~     ~     ~     ~

 

Appendix  ' B '

R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer Physical Fitness and Entertainment  -  November 1943

 

This month has been busy on the sorts side, though P.T. has been rather erratic owing to operational commitments of flying personnel. Badminton is increasing in popularity, but mixed hockey had to be abandoned owing to lack of co-operation from the W.A.A.F.'s.

Physical Training Summary :-     An average of twenty two persons from the following units :-     R.A.F. Regiment, No.279 Air Sea Rescue Squadron, No.266 ( Rhodesia ) Squadron and Station Headquarters ( Tabloid Defence Course ).

Work Done :-     Basic purposeful table, Parachute synthetic training, Agility and enurance work and minor games.

Sport :-     Soccer     Two types of matches were played by the Station Team - friendly and league ( Plymouth Combination ). This month has seen an astonishing improvement in the Station Team.

League Matches

               V     R.A.F. Anthony                         won     5  -  3

               V     Spartan                                    won   12  -  1

Friendly

               V     Practice Camp Okehampton     draw     2  -  2

               V     French Ship ' Paris '                  draw     1  -  1

               V     Royal Engineering College          won     8  -  1

 

A live and interested entertainments committee has been formed.

Wall Newspaper :-     Mention should be made of the Station Wall Newspaper  " The Typhoon ". This has achieved it's second edition and expresses the Station opinions as well as providing a little entertainment.

 

Station Sick Quarters  -  Form 540

               The Form 540 for November was signed by Squadron Leader F. Constable, Senior Medical Officer.

          1st November    Strength of Station including units from R.A.F. Bolt Head and units attached to medical administration :-     R.A.F.  =  1582     W.A.A.F.  =  432     Army  =  138

          4th November     A Corporal Fitter from No.3013 Echelon was struck by a propeller when working on a machine sustaining injury to his head, right shoulder and forearm and right thigh - he was admitted direct to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth.

          5th November     Patients admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital for week ending today :-     R.A.F.  =  12     W.A.A.F.  =  64     Army  =  Nil

          12th November     Patients admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital for week ending today :-     R.A.F.  =  16     W.A.A.F.  =  4    Army  =  1

          17th November     Flight Lieutenant Chapman, the Medical Officer for No.193 Squadron was attached to the R.A.F. Institute of Pathology and Tropical Medicine, Halton.

          19th November     Patients admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital for week ending today :-     R.A.F.  =  17     W.A.A.F.  =  8     Army  =  1     A.T.S.  =  2

          23rd November    A Sergeant of the R.A.M.C. ( attached to the Quartering Commandant, Tavistock for Sanitary Duties ) was involved in an accident on Crapstone Road, Horrabridge when his motorcycle he was riding crashed head on into an on-coming R.A.F. lorry, sustaining a compound fracture to the right tibia and fibula, concussion and cuts to his face. First Aid was rendered in the Medical Centre and the patient was then transferred to Mount Gould Orthopaedic Hospital, Plymouth.

          26th November     Patients admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital for week ending today :-     R.A.F.  =  22     W.A.A.F.  =  9     Army  =  5

 

From the Squadron O.R.B.'s

 

No.193 Squadron :-

          1st November     A poor start to the month as far as the weather is concerned. No flying, synthetics where possible.

          2nd November     Another miserable day.     At 1400 hours the Squadron was released as the weather had clamped down completely.

          3rd November     Another  " HARROWBEER "  day, bags of rain and low cloud. There was no flying until after dusk. The morning was spent on synthetics.

          4th November     A better day with the Squadron on state from 0700 hours. Some air-testing took place early on followed by wing practice with No.266 ( Rhodesia ) Squadron. There was much practice flying in the afternoon including dog-fights, air to sea firing, air to air firing and aerobatics.

          5th November     The morning was spent on intelligence work and the afternoon on synthetics.

          6th November     In the early afternoon four of the Squadron aircraft took part in the Squadron's first ' Ranger ' operation which was, however, rendered abortive owing to u/s weather over the French coast area.     The day finished with a night flying exercise.

          8th November     The weather today was terrible again, a no flying day - a projected shipping reconnaissance had to be abandoned.

          9th November     A ' Ranger ' operation was again postponed, just as the four Typhoon aircraft taking part had become airborne at 0945 hours, with the result that the Typhoons had taken off and landed over a period of ten minutes.     After ninety minutes the operation was " on " again. Four Typhoon aircraft took off at 1125 hours on Ranger No.100 and crossed the coast at zero feet to Cap D'enquay, they then turned left and attacked their target ( Dinard Aerodrome ) from south to north. Hits were seen on dispersals, hangars and the watch office as bursts were fired by all four pilots, but no damage has been claimed. There was accurate flak from around the airfield, particularly the north west area. All aircraft returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer landing at 1246 hours. No enemy aircraft were seen on the airfield. No enemy shipping was sighted. Still the general feeling seems to be that any moment now a FW190, JU88, ME10 or some of the other enemy targets are going to " catch a packet " if these " Ranger and Rhubarb " operations continue to be authorised.

          10th November     A bitof a flap as operations came through with revised instructions. First of all in accordance with instructions received yesterday, bomb racks were being fitted to some of the Typhoon aircraft and while in the middle of this job, and after initial arrangements had been made to carry out a convoy escort, word came through that we were expected to escort eight Bomphoon aircraft of No.183 Squadron on an attack of some minesweepers. Everything was cancelled in favour of the attack of the minesweeper operation which was carried out successfully. Eight Typhoon aircraft took off at 1310 hours on escort duty for Roadstead No.79. The aircraft flew at zero feet to Trglar Point then in a south west direction over Le Trieux and out at Minaid Point climbing to five thousand feet. When ten miles clear of the French Coast on the way back to base they saw eight ships in an estuary, thought to be two or three ' M ' class minesweepers and four to five escort vessels. On looking back a few seconds later they saw thick black smoke pouring from two or three of the ships in that position. There was intense light flak and black bursts at seven to ten thousand feet. No enemy aircraft were seen. Visibility over the target was excellent. All aircraft landed back at base at 1436 hours.

          11th November     Two sections were at stand-by and another at readiness, from 1300 hours.     Several pilots had their ' Bombing Baptism ' practice today when the Squadron's first bombing practice was carried out.

          15th November     After three days of bad weather bombing practice continued and the Squadron was on state from first light to last light.

          16th November     Seven of No.193 Squadron's Typhoon aircraft left for R.A.F. Predannack in the early morning with four of them carrying out an operation from there. The operation was to be Circus No.66. The four Typhoon aircraft took off from R.A.F. Predannack at 1201 hours and crossed the French Coast at Ile De Vierge, they found the target covered in 9/10 cloud with a top at one thousand feet. It was decided that the aircraft should return to base jettisoning their bombs on the way. There was intense, heavy flak at Brest. The Typhoon aircraft landed back at R.A.F. Predannack at 1304 hours.     Practice flying was carried out at R.A.F. Harrowbeer by the rest of the Squadron.

          17th November     An armed shipping reconnaissance was carried out just after first light by four Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron. The aircraft were fitted with ' long range fuel tanks ' and ordered off on an offensive reconnaissance at 0604 hours along with four Typhoon aircraft of No.266( Rhodesia ) Squadron. The aircraft flew at sea level from Bolt Head to Sillon De Talbert, nothing was seen on the way out. One Typhoon aircraft of No.266 Squadron developed engine trouble half way across the Channel and returned to base with his No.2. The rest of the formation flew on parallel to the Lezardrieux Estuary where the leader saw a small ship in the estuary, he turned left and attacked it. The ship was a small armed trawler, many strikes were seen but results could not be checked due to the speed of the aircraft. One of the pilots from No.193 Squadron attacked a flak position on the way in and also fired a short burst at a motor launch in the estuary. The flak position was on the end of a jetty consisting of two times twenty millimeter guns, it is considered that the crew could not have survived. There was intense light flak from the shore positions and one pilot saw gunfire from the trawler. Afew bursts of heavy flak was experienced near the estuary mouth. After the attack the Typhoon aircraft carried out reconnaissance in the Ile De Batz area, nothing was seen. The formation landed back at base at 0934 hours.     Immediately after this operation the Commanding Officer left for London to attend a luncheon at the Brazillian Embassy.

          18th November     A fighter sweep and a shipping reconnaissance was carried out today by the Squadron. At 0817 hours eight Typhoon aircraft took off on Rodeo No.47 with eight Typhoon aircraft of No.266 Squadron. The formation was to sweep Rennes and Gael at two thousand feet. They then turned on a course to Mont St. Michael, but shortly found the weather 10/10, a bank of cumulus cloud at twenty thousand feet, so they turned west and found a clear patch north of Pontivy. The Typhoon aircraft swept the area then flew out over Lezardrieux at ten thousand feet. Nothing was seen in the harbour. The weather was 10/10 at two thousand feet over the Channel. All aircraft landed back at base at 1011 hours.     A shipping reconnaissance was carried out at 1628 hours in the Sept Isles - Ile Vierge area. There was no enemy aircrat or shipping seen. The weather was 5/10 cloud at two thousand feet with visibility at fifteen miles. The aircraft landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1751 hours.     Practice flying was undertaken by the remainder of the flying personnel at base.

          22nd November     A special rehersal was made today in preparation for the vist by the Brazillian Air Mission. An excellent air demonstration was given by the Squadron when sixteen Squadron Typhoon aircraft took to the air together. This was followed by a most thrilling display of aerobatics by the Commanding Officer of No.193 Squadron. After being introduced to all the pilots the Brazillian Mission adjourned to the Squadron Mess at Whistley, where a few drinks were consumed in vey congenial surroundings and much discussion, technical and otherwise was made.

The Brazillian Mission headed by :- Lieutenant Colonel Renaldo Carvelho

                              consisted of :- Captain Hamlet Estella

                                                    Captain Henique Penna

                                                    Captain Alfonso Arjcosta

Flight Lieutenant Dickenson and Pilot Officer Prettyman acted as guides and comforters, the latter acting as interpreter.

          23rd November     After the discussion in the Squadron Mess the previous evening on the diverse merits of the 20mm cannon and the .5 machine gun, our guests were taken to the stop butts this morning and each in turn fired the four cannon in a Typhoon aircraft and we think rather impressed.     An even more spectacular flying demonstration was given by the Squadron today for the benefit of our Brazillian friends. After a hearty lunch the Mission took their departure singing the praises of the Ttphoon aircraft and No.193 Squadron pilots in general. Altogether a most successful and interesting outing for everyone.

          24th November

 

 

~    ~    ~    ~
 

October  1943 

Wing Commander J. Butterworth is the Commanding Officer for R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer and signed the Operation Record Book for October.

 

Visitors to R.A.F. Harrowbeer included :-

          Major C. Collins  -  No.46 Search Light Unit

          Flight Lieutenant Pearce  -  No.10 Group Headquarters

          Squadron Leader Allcott  -  No.10 Group

          His Excellency the Brazillian Ambassador and Ambassadoress

          Lord Sherwood  -  The Under Secretary of State

          Lord Wimborne  -  Parliamentary Private Secretary

          Lady Astor  -

          Air Vice Marshal Steele  -  Air Officer Commanding No.10 Group

          Group Captain Guinness  - 

          Flight Lieutenant Teeling  -  Air Ministry

          B.B.C. Representatives  -  Recording Unit

          Paramount News Representatives  -  Recording Unit

          Squadron Leader Callander  -  Officer Commanding No.2891 Squadron R.A.F. Regiment

          Flight Lieutenant Heal  -  No.1 Signals Department

          Squadron Leader Gilligan  -  Air Ministry

          Wing Commander  Rattraylow R.C.A.F.  -  Welfare of Canadian Personnel

          Squadron Leader Graham R.C.A.F.  -  Welfare of Canadian Personnel

          Flight Lieutenant Alghte R.C.A.F.  -  Welfare of Canadian Personnel

          Flight Lieutenant Ninter R.C.A.F.  -  Welfare of Canadian Personnel

          Squadron Leader Holmes  -  R.A.F. Station Exeter

          Flight Lieutenant Simpkins  -  Air Ministry ( Equipment )

          Lieutenant Colonel Conrad  -  Commander 15th Battalion Home Guard

          Pilot Officer Corrigan  -  D.A.P.M.

          Flight Lieutenant Manison  -  Headquarters Fighter Command ( Catering )

          Group Captain Stannard  -  Headquarters Fighter Command

 

Weather

          1st October     A miserable start to the month. Haze right down to the deck with low cloud and intermittent showers.

          2nd October     A better day, allowing a considerable amount of flying to take place. A beautiful day with plenty of sunshine.

          3rd October     A fairly good day again. Cloudy later on in the day.

          4th October     Not a very promising morning. After 1100 hours the weather clamped down completely. Lots of low cloud and poor visibility.

          5th October     Another miserable morning, low cloud and poor visibility. Real Harrowbeer weather.

          6th October     Same again, low cloud and poor visibility - impossible weather.

          7th October     A much better morning, sunshine and great visibility about fifteen to twenty miles.

          8th October     A fairly good morning although there were large patches of haze north and north west of the aerodrome. Visibility was fair with 5/10th cloud.

          9th October     The weather was reasonable for most of the day with bags of flying going on. The day finished with the weather deteriorating with a 10/10 low cloud.

          10th October     A beautiful day at Harrowbeer. Visibility was good.

          11th October     There was a moderate start to the day, much low 10/10 cloud down to hill tops and a thick haze about, gradually clearing later. By 1600 hours the weather had cleared completely.

          12th October     A poor start to the day with thick haze closing in. Later in the day the weather clamped down completely. There was 10/10 cloud with visibility ranging from fair to poor resulting in a no flying day.

          13th October     Yet another typical Harrowbeer day. In the morning heavy rain and thick fog right down on the deck, a complete clamp down. By 1300 hours however the weather cleared nicely.

          14th October     Today commenced with a beautiful morning.

          15th October     Another favourable, brilliant day.

          16th October     Typical Harrowbeer weather again, torrential rain and low cloud. A no flying day. The torrential rain and strong howling wind persisted all day.

          17th October     A moderate morning today with good visibility.

          18th October     Yet another ropey day, although there were short bright intervals. Visibility was fair to good.

          19th October     A poor start to the day again. Later on in the day the weather clamped down completely making flying impossible. Appalling weather, sheets of rain, high winds. Visibility was under two hundred yards in the rain.

          20th October     The morning started miserably, heavy rain and high winds. Visibility at times was less than four hundred yards with low clouds on the hills. In spite of the bad start to the day by 1200 hours the weather had cleared somewhat.

          21st October     The day opened with dull weather again, there was 8/10 cloud with no wind. More bad weather arrived in the afternoon.

          22nd October     Bad weather throughout the day - there was a 6/10 cloud ceiling at eight thousand feet, no wind.

          23rd October     The weather was bad again first thing this morning. The aerodrome was in cloud until around 1000 hours clearing rapidly in the afternoon.

          24th October     The day commenced showery, turning fine later on with good visibility.

          25th October     A remarkable day, it broke perfectly for a change, no cloud and no wind.

          26th October     Another fine, beautiful day.

          27th October     The bad weather returns, overcast but warm with no wind. The day still became a no operational flying day.

          28th October     The day started poorly with low cloud early on which cleared as the day progressed.

          29th October     A somewhat hazy start today clearing up later to become a beautiful day.

          30th October     The day commenced badly with 10/10 low cloud and bad visibility, however it did manage to clear in the afternoon.

          31st October     Yet more bad weather, 10/10 cloud and continuous rain.

 

From the Station O.R.B.

 

          2nd October     Two Officers and six cadets of No.339 Paignton Squadron Air Training Corps arrived on the Station for a seven day instructional visit.

          6th October     No.2738 Squadron R.A.F. Regiment left R.A.F. Harrowbeer for training at Filey, their place being taken by ' A ' Flight of No.2593 Squadron who remained until the end of the month.

          9th October     Major C. Collins of No.46 Search Light Regiment visited the Station for a conference with the Local Defence Advisor..

          15th October     Squadron Leader Allcott of Headquarters No.10 Group visited the Station in connection with arrangements for the forthcoming ceremony of the adoption of No.193 Squadron by Brazil.

          16th October     The Station had the honour of receiving His Excellency the Brazillian Ambassador, accompanied by the Ambassadoresss in a distinguished company of visitors. The Occasion was to mark the official adoption of No.193 Squadron by Brazil through the agency of the Fellowship of the Bellows, who subscribed sufficient money to buy a Squadron of Typhoon aircraft. The main part of the ceremony was conducted on the runway where No.193 Squadron were on parade with their machines. The weather conditions were anything but favourable and torrential rain and high wind prevailed throughout the proceedings. The arrangements were to include a fly-past but owing to the weather there was a taxi-past of aircraft and speeches of the excellencies in Portuguese. The entire party then went to the Officer's Mess for luncheon. In spite of the adverse weather conditions the proceedings throughout were carried out without a hitch and their excellencies graciously expressed their appreciation of the arrangements made for their reception and entertainment.

          20th October     Flight Lieutenant Heal from No.1 Signals Department visited the Station Signals Office.

          22nd October     Wing Commander Rattraylow, Squadron Leader Graham, Flight Lieutenant Alghte and Flight Lieutenant Ninter, all R.C.A.F. visited the Station in connection with the Welfare of Canadian Personnel.

          25th October     Group Captain Stannard, Headquarters Fighter Command visited the Station Commander.

          26th October     Squadron Leader Holmes from R.A.F. Exeter visited the Station.

          27th October     Lieutenant Colonel Conrads, Commanding 15th Battalion Home Guards visited the Local Defence Advisor.

          31st October     No.2891 Squadron R.A.F. Regiment moved in, in place of No.2738 Squadron R.A.F. Regiment.

 

Appendix  ' A '

 

Physical Fitness and Entertainment for  -  October 1943

 

Physical Fitness :-     An average of thirty personnel per day take part in fitness activities, just less than one third of these are flying personnel.     Flying personnel, mainly from No.279 Air Sea Rescue Squadron take physical training and recreational games, using the gymnasium and boxing.     W.A.A.F. physical training has stopped at the request of the W.A.A.F. Warrant Officer.

Soccer :-     The Station IX has members of the Plymouth Combination League and have played the following matches :-

     2 - 10 - 43     V     N.F.S. League                                        lost     7 - 1

     9 - 10 - 43     V     Princetown Prison Warders ( friendly )  won     2 - 1

   23 - 10 - 43     V     Okehampton M.U. ( friendly )                won     6 - 2

    30 - 1 - 43     V     E. M. Department ( league )                    lost     6 - 0

Inter Section Competition :-     This competition is now well under way. Eight teams are involved and to date eleven matches have been played.

Badminton :-     Played regularly by a small group of enthusiasts and some coaching has been going on.

' Dispersal ' games :-    A tenequoit court has been marked outside the gymnasium and Dispersals are also provided with " a purpose " nets for use in Dispersal activities.

Boxing :-     Three men from this Station entered a competition at R.A.F. Mount Batten and all three won their bouts.

Hockey :-     A mixed match with R.A.F. Collaton is due early next month. Hockey is greatly hampered on this Station owing to the inability to find a suitable pitch and consequent lack of practice.

Entertainments :-     Brain Trust sessions have been started. A play reading circle which is hoped may grow into a dramatic society is meeting regularly and a hobbies club is in formation.

The first edition of a Station ' Wall-Newspaper ' has been ' published ' and the second is now being made up.

Cinema :-     E.N.S.A. shows are every other Monday. Station shows are every Wednesday ( admission free alternate weeks ).

E.N.S.A. Shows :-     Fortnightly E.N.S.A. shows have taken place in all cases of variety.

Music :-     A visit to the ' Fighter Command Military Band ' took place on 12/10/1943. Vocal and piano recitals by Mary Crook, Norah Veal and Flying Officer A. R. Williams was on 2/10/1943.     There is a weekly meeting of a record music circle called " Harmony Hour ".

Brains Trust :-     Two meetings have taken place and proved very popular and stimulating.

Dances :-     Three Station Dances this month which were very well supported.

" Housie " :-     A " Housie " evening took place in the N.A.A.F.I. on 15/10/1943 and was very successful.

 

Station Sick Quarters  -  Form 540 

          The S.S.Q. Form 540 for October was signed by Squadron Leader F. Constable, Senior Medical Officer.

          1st October     Strength of Station including units from R.A.F. Bolt Head and units attached for medical admissions :-     R.A.F.  =  1646     W.A.A.F.  =  438     Army  =  88

          1st October     Patients admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital for week ending today :-     R.A.F.  =  10     W.A.A.F.  =  6

          8th October     Patients admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital for week ending today :-     R.A.F.  =  14     W.A.A.F.  =  3

          8th October     An LAC from No.3013 Echelon was involved in an accident at R.A.F. Harrowbeer on 4th October 1943 when he was crushed between a lorry and a petrol bowser, resulting in a ' fractured pelvis '. He was admitted direct from the Medical Centre at R.A.F. Harrowbeer to the Royal Naval Hospital, Plymouth.

          15th October     Patients admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital for week ending today :-     R.A.F.  =  8     W.A.A.F.  =  5

          22nd October     Patients admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital for week ending today :-     R.A.F.  =  13     W.A.A.F.  =  7

          23rd October     A Nursing Orderly from No.266 ( Rhodesia ) Squadron was knocked off his bicycle on the Plymouth to Tavistock road by a motorcycle, stated to have been driven by a U.S. Dispatch Rider. He was admitted to the Station Sick Quarters with ' incised wound to left forearm '.

          29th October     Patients admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital for week ending today :-     R.A.F.  =  18     W.A.A.F.  =  7

 

From the Squadron O.R.B.'s

 

No.193 Squadron :-

          1st October     A miserable start to the month.     No flying as the weather clamped down eventually today.     Synthetics were carried out where possible.

          2nd October     A considerable amount of flying undertaken as the weather has improved, including a ' Balbo ' exercise, aerobatics and camera-gun work.

          3rd October     Eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron along with eight Typhoon aircraft of No.266 ( Rhodesia ) Squadron formed up as second forward cover on ' Ramrod No.90 '. The eight Typhoon aircraft from No.193 Squadron set course from R.A.F. Harrowbeer and crossed the French Coast climbing to five thousand feet. At a point later realized to be ten miles west of Sillon De Talbert Islands off the coast were mistaken for Islands named Le Grand Pourier, a course was therefore altered starboard and height reduced to two thousand feet as cloud base was three thousand four hundred feet. Soon we flew around the airfield which was recognized as Lannion and our position was realized. We re-crossed the coast at Tradnezand set course for home. Lannion Airfield was deserted. There was no enemy aircraft or flak.     No bombers were seen and no shipping sighted. The formation were fired on by Naval vessels believed to be destroyers, near Eddystone. After returning to base it was discovered that the Wing Leader's compass ( the Commanding Officer of No.266 Squadron ) was wrong by six degrees, this accounted for the wrong landfall being made by the second cover this afternoon.

          5th October     Another miserable morning.     Synthetics where possible.     Those who had not already done so, took the " Ranger Estimation Test ". The whole Squadron has now passed the test satisfactorily.

          6th October     More Link Trainer synthetics and intelligence work.

          7th October     As the weather has improved there was a lot more practice flying carried out including - battle formation, tail chasing, air to air firing, etc.      At 1400 hours the stand-by section were scrambled to intersect a " bogey ". They were vectored onto a Mosquito aircraft which fired colours of the day, otherwise it was uneventful and the section were ordered to pancake at 1430 hours.

          8th October     Eight of the Squadron's Typhoon aircraft took part in ' Ramrod No.91 ' from R.A.F. Predannack. At 1504 hours they were airborne and set course for the Lizard, Cornwall. From there they flew a course crossing the French Coast at Porapoder at two thousand feet. Next they flew on to the target area at Lanumeau and out at Morlaix. The aircraft arrived before the beehive and left after the bombs were seen on buildings near the airfield. The bombers and escort left at Plouescat in good order. Visibility was good with a slight haze. The eight Typhoons landed back at base at 1612 hours.

          9th October     Nine of the Squadron Typhoon aircraft, operating from base this time took part in ' Ramrod No.92 ' acting with No.266 Squadron as first target support wing.

          10th October     Again the weather allowed plenty of practice flying to take place. however the day was marked by an accident in the afternoon. On taking off in the afternoon a pilot had the misfortune to loose a tyre of the port landing wheel, the tyre came clean away from the wheel and carried on for about forty tards along the runway. As a result the pilot had to make a belly landing and although a beautiful landing was made, the aircraft was rendered category A/C. Unfortunately an unavoidable accident but bad luck after the Squadron's fine record.

          11th October     Another day of practice flying.     At 1930 hours a special meeting of aircrew was held at Intelligence, when much to the satisfaction of the troops a representative from the Air Ministry, after making a special trip through R.A.F. Harrowbeer conveyed the news that No.193 Squadron had been adopted by Brazil. An official ceremony will take place in order to initiate the Squadron into the Brazilian Fellowship of the Bellows. The Ambassadoress of Brazil is we believe to be the Squadron's Godmother as from that date.     Good show.

          12th October     At the Officer's Mess meeting - the first for some considerable time - the Commanding Officer was elected as P.M.C. without of course being present to defend himself. What with being recalled early from leave in order to attend Saturday's ceremony and finding himself elected as in this case, he may well consider whether or not it would be advisable to arrange to spend the next leave within a radius of ten miles from base.

          13th October     Another typical Harrowbeer day with the weather, heavy rain and thick fog fight down on the deck.     ' B ' Flight were able to carry out a night flying exercise, the last aircraft making the final pancake at 2315 hours.

          14th October     Eight Typhoon aircraft took part in ' Circus No.56 ' from R.A.F. Predannack which was rendered abortive owing to the u/s weather.

          15th October     A great improvement in the weather today.    The Commanding Officer arrived back from leave early this morning in preparation for tomorrow's show.     The Commanding Officer led nine Typhoon aircraft on an exercise today.     If only the weather holds!

          16th October     This is a notable day in the history of No.193 Squadron.     But what a morning, typical Harrowbeer weather. Torrential rain and low cloud. It is clear that no flying will take place today.          The outdoor part of the ceremony will have to be cut short owing to the unpleasant circumstances. The nine Typhoon aircraft which represented the number of aircraft which Brazil through the Fellowship of the Bellows had gifted to the Squadron are lined up on the runway with the Brazilian flag draped from the Commanding Officer's aircraft.Everybody looked clean and smart at the outset, but unfortunately, the rain soon changed that. The Brazilian Ambassador gave a most impressive address. This was followed by a message from the Ambassadoress in which she offered to be Godmother to the Squadron. Squadron Leader G. W. Petre, No.193 Squadron Commanding Officer gave a reply in which he expressed our gratitude and pleasure in accepting the Ambassadoress offer. The torrential rain and strong wind continued throughout the ceremony, leaving everyone present soaked through to their underwear. A taxi-pass by the nine Typhoon aircraft completed the outdoor part of the official ceremony. This was followed by a hurried change into dry clothing and return to the Officer's Mess where an exchange of gifts was made, followed by lunch. Before making their departure, our newly formed friends expressed their deep appreciation for the kindness shown to them. A link has been formed in the Fellowship of the Bellows and we are indeed proud to have received this honour today. ' Ordum E Progresso ' - so blow to it, for the bellows will not cease blowing until the axis airforce has been blasted out of the skies. A special Squadron celebration will take place later.

          17th October     Nine Typhoon aircraft flew to R.A.F. Predannack, up at 0745 hours.          Two operations were carried out from there.     One - the first was by aircraft which were airborne at 1001 hours on ' Rodeo No.43 ' and set course for the Lizard, Cornwall then on to the French Coast. When the formation were off St. Matthieu they turned back as there was 7/10 cloud at sixteen hundred feet and rain showers. One section of the Squadron did manage to prang an enemy trawler, while another section swept the decks of a cargo vessel with cannon fire. Both ships were armed, hits were seen on them and the ships were left smoking.     A second operation ' Roadstead No.45 ' an anti shipping strike was organised from R.A.F. Predannack taking off at 1235 hours. Again No.193 Squadron set course for the Lizard, Cornwall followed by aircraft from No.266 Squadron and were to act as escort to four Typhoon bombers of No.183 Squadron with whom they had made rendezvous with over base. The formation flew at zero feet to St. Matthieu where a large orbit was made into the bay south o St. Matthieu searching for ships damaged in the earlier sortie. No shipping was seen, so the formation returned on a reciprocal course. In view of the fact that the vessels were damaged just at the entrance to Brest Harbour, the possibility is that they were salvaged. No enemy aircraft were sighted. Visibility was fifteen miles. There were scattered rainstorms which were avoided. No.193 and No.266 Squadrons returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1415 hours.

          18th October     The Officer's " mucked in " removing from the old billets of No.5 and No.6 dispersed sites to " Whistley ". This time all being billeted in one building and nearer dispersals.

          20th October     Problems relating to the new billets discussed. Things look a bit cramped there in many ways.

          22nd October     In the afternoon, two sections of ' B ' Flight were airborne on Rhubarb operations. The first was along the railway line from Landemeau to Morlaix and the other from Morlaix to Plouaret. Both sorties were spoilt by bad weather and rain on the French side of the English Channel.

          23rd October     Five Typhoon aircraft from ' A ' Flight and six Typhoon aircraft from ' B ' Flight flew to R.A.F. Bolt Head in the early afternoon. Eight of these Typhoons were airborne at 1555 hours to act as rear support in an operation with No.183 Squadron Bomphoons, also to be escorted by No.266 Squadron. They set course from R.A.F. Bolt Head and after five minutes the bombers and escorts climbed to twelve thousand feet and dive bombed five destroyers in St. Malo Harbour. Good bombing results were sighted. All aircraft then returned to their respective bases, No.193 Squadron landing at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1725 hours.

          24th October     There was a scramble in the afternoon where various vectors were given but cumulus cloud at the ' bandits ' height prevented a visual being obtained.     During the morning four Typhoon aircraft patrolled St. Malo on a shipping reconnaissance using ' long range fuel tanks '.

          25th October     Eight Typhoon aircraft provided rear cover to twenty four Mitchel bomber aircraft who were to bomb Poulmic. One was seen to be shot down by flak over the target area.

          26th October     Eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron plus aircraft from No.266 ( Rhodesia ) Squadron  were to provide rear cover to No.183 Squadron bombing Ploumic.

          28th October     Eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron were airborne at 1400 hours to act as top cover with No.266 Squadron to Mitchel bomber aircraft, Whirlwind bomber aircraft and Typhoon bomber aircraft operating against Cherbourg Harbour. They encountered heavy flak over the Cherbourg Peninsular during the operation. No.193 Squadron's Typhoons landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1540 hours.

          29th October     At 1040 hours eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron with Typhoon aircraft of No.266 Squadron swept the Brest area, passing south of the town at twenty thousand feet while No.183 Squadron bombed Guipavas and observed good results. Ships were observed in the harbour and at Rade De Brest. There was flak to the south of the town, long range fuel tanks that were used were dropped at Landemeau. Visibility was moderate. The Squadron landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1215 hours.

          30th October     The stand-by section were scrambled and were closing on the ' bandits ' when the pilots lost them near the Channel Islands.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of October was signed by :-  Squadron Leader G. W. Petre.

 

No.266 ( Rhodesia ) Squadron :-

          1st October     No operational flying today.     When the Squadron was released they went into Plymouth in the " bus ". They had a terrific high tea and then some went to the pictures, others round to the docks and several hotels were visited before returning to base.

          2nd October     No operational flying.     Practice flying consisted of a formation of ten Typhoon aircraft and a practice wing of eleven aircraft with No.193 Squadron. Three aircraft practiced battle formations.

          3rd October     Eight Typhoon aircraft along with eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron were detailed to sweep from Yffiniac to St. Alban but the Commanding Officer's compass was wrong despite the fact that it was a new aircraft and had it's deviation card made out ten days before by the Maintenance Unit and landfall was actually made at a point ten miles west of Sillon De Talbert. This point was mistaken for one east of St. Alban, so the formation turned west to do a sweep in the reverse direction but flew over Lannion and saw no enemy aircraft. Had we gone to the right place we might have seen the enemy aircraft which No.183 Squadron met.

          4th October     Three Typhoon aircraft went off on a sea patrol west of Ushant and landed back at R.A.F. Predannack. These three aircraft were unable to return to R.A.F. Harrowbeer as the weather had closed completely.

          6th October     Four Typhoon aircraft on a formation practice flight had to land after fifteen minutes owing to bad weather conditions.

          7th October     The three Typhoon aircraft that landed at R.A.F. Predannack on the 4th October returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer today.     Ten Typhoon aircraft carried out a square formation flight, others did sector reconnaissance flights and some pilots did aircraft recognition tests.

          8th October     Nine No.266 Squadron Typhoon aircraft took off from R.A.F. Predannack with eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron to act as target support in a large operation in which eighteen Boston aircraft were to be escorted by several Squadrons of fighters. The Boston aircraft were to bomb Poulmic Aerodrome. We arrived as arranged over the target area before the ' beehive ', we saw the bombs fall amongst buildings near the airfield but did not see any enemy aircraft.

          9th October    Seven Typhoon aircraft took part in a sweep with No.193 Squadron to Guipavas. No enemy aircraft were seen but heavy flak was experienced. The weather over the target area was 10/10 cloud and on their return the Squadron became separated. Two aircraft of No.266 Squadron found themselves above 10/10 low cloud with practically no petrol left. They came down through a hole in the clouds and saw St. Meryn Aerodrome and had to land immediately. This ' drome is under repair and partially obstructed. They landed on any runway and just managed to pull up in time without hitting anything. A very shaky do! !

          11th October     One Typhoon aircraft on local flying.          The Squadron was released from 1600 hours and fifteen pilots went into Plymouth on a Liberty run.

          12th October     The weather is so bad today that it has been declared a no flying day. Range estimation and aircraft recognition was the order of the day.

          13th October     Another bad day with the weather. Aircraft recognition exams for ten pilots and clay pigeon shooting.

          14th October     Brilliant weather today.     Eight Typhoon aircraft with eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron took off for R.A.F. Predannack, the intention was to sweep over Brest, Guipavas area but when the formation reached Ushant the leader decided the weather was u/s. The formation turned, swept along the north coast to Aber Vrach where there was a clear patch they turned south and penetrated some 'ailes until the weather was again u/s and they returned for home.

          15th October     Two Typhoon aircraft were scrambled from stand-by for two FW190's which had made landfall over Brixham. The section was vectored south to the south of Bolt Head and when at eight thousand feet saw two enemy aircraft diving down to one thousand feet heading south. The section dived after them overtaking very easily. One of he FW190's was selected by one of the pilots and had a bit of a turning match with it, but then it very obligingly straightened out and the pilot was able to get in several good bursts from dead astern. The enemy aircraft's starboard undercart dropped and after another burst the pilot baled out. His parachute was seen to open. Meanwhile the other No.266 Squadron pilot took on the other FW 190 which after turning a bit flew straight and the pilot fired a number of bursts at it seeing strikes and smoke. The enemy aircraft started turning again and after some deflection shots the No.266 Squadron pilot ran out of ammunition. He radioed to his companion who chased after the enemy aircraft and gave it a short burst, the FW190 blew up and crashed into the sea. The cine camera gun films of both aircraft were very good. A fix was transmitted for the German pilot who had baled out of his aircraft.

          17th October     Nine Typhoon aircraft of No.266 Squadron with eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron took off from R.A.F. Predannack and swept over the Brest area. No.193 Squadron saw and attacked two ships.     Later eight Typhoon aircraft of No.266 Squadron escorted four Bomphoons of No.183 Squadron, with No.193 Squadron as anti flak cover. They flew down to Point St. Mattieu to attack the ships seen earlier. No shipping was seen so all aircraft returned to their respective bases.

          18th October     The Squadron received ' long range fuel tanks ' today, ( each tank contained forty five gallons of aviation fuel ) most of the aircraft are to be fitted and tested with these tanks.

          19th and 20th October     Bad weather conditions today resulted in very little practice flying by the pilots.

          21st October     Test flights carried out with the long range fuel tanks. The newest Typhoon aircraft coming along do 260 miles per hour with the long range fuel tanks fitted; ie. they are just as fast as the older aircraft without the tanks.

          22nd October     Six Typhoon aircraft took off from R.A.F. Predannack and flew to a point about twenty five miles west of Ushant and then patrolled north and south for about an  hour. This is the first time the Squadron have used the long range fuel tanks on an operational flight. The tanks were not jettisoned and brought back to base.

         23rd October     Six Typhoon aircraft took off from R.A.F. Bolt Head with eight Bomphoon aircraft of No.183 Squadron and flew to the St. Malo estuary. Diving from ten thousand feet the Bomphoons bombed three destroyers and several other smaller ships in the St. Malo estuary mouth. We saw one certain and one possible hit on the destroyers and many near misses. No enemy aircraft were seen and slight inaccurate flak was experienced. All aircraft landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer.

          24th October     Eight Typhoon aircraft took off from R.A.F. Harrowbeer to sweep over Lezardrieux Estuary to see if there were any ships there. Landfall was made far to the west and the Squadron were very near to Lannion Airfield ( which looked deserted ). The section then flew southwards to the railway and turned west to Morlaix near to Morlaix Airfield ( which also looked deserted ) so they flew northwards heading for home. All this was carried out at two thousand feet, yet no flak was experienced and no enemy aircraft seen. Lezardrieux was thus not adequately covered and on landing we offered to do the trip again.     In the afternoon four Typhoon aircraft flew to Cherbourg Harbour to spot the damage done to a large merchant-ship which had been bombed a few minutes earlier by aircraft of No.263 Squadron. All our pilots saw was that the ship was well on fire. Considerable light and heavy flak was encountered but none really near to our aircraft. All the aircraft landed at R.A.F. Warmwell, Dorset on their return.     Non operational aircraft made a long low cross country flight lasting two hours twenty minutes testing their long range fuel tanks for fuel consumption.

          25th October     Eight Typhoon aircraft acted as top cover with eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron to Mitchel bomber aircraft who were to bomb Landveoc Airfield. Bursts were seen on the south side of the airfield. The Commanding Officer had to return early with engine trouble. Two other aircraft also returned early due to one of them having a long range fuel tank that would not jettison. A large merchant vessel was seen steaming east towards Brest. One of the Mitchel bomber aircraft was seen shot down by flak.     In the evening a very rowdy party started in the Mess, then at the Rock Hotel which continued again on returning to the Mess which finished off by shaving moustaches off in the billets, some were a complete write off, others were repairable.

          26th October     Six Typhoon aircraft along with eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron were to sweep Lanveoc Airfield, two minutes after Bomphoon aircraft of No.183 Squadron had bombed it. As we appeared to be late, the formation crossed the coast near Abervrach and swept over Guipavas Airfield to Landerneau where the long range fuel tanks were jettisoned. Four of the aircraft had hang-ups with their tanks, so Squadron Leader Lefevre decided that the whole formation would return to base instead of in sections. As they turned north for home they saw aircraft from No.610 Squadron.

          27th October     Four Typhoon aircraft carried out an anti-rhubarb patrol between Guernsey and Alderney at one thousand feet, but saw nothing.     Non operational flying included cloud flying, formation flying, an affiliation exercise with a Sunderland flying boat, aerobatics at eight thousand feet and cine camera work.

          28th October     Eight Typhoon aircraft of No.266 Squadron with eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron went out on an operation making landfall at Cap Plamanville at two thousand feet and swept four times across the peninsular before returning back to base. There was heavy flak from Cherbourg very near to us. Bombs were seen to burst in the Cherbourg area.

          29th October     Eight Typhoon aircraft with long range fuel tanks took off with eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron and swept over Abervrach at eighteen thousand feet. They then flew straight on over Landerneau to Creaxch Gurnnou then turned west to St. Mattieu and home. They saw flak over Guipavas in the distance as No.183 Squadron bombed Guipavas Airfield. There was some flak seen from Poulmic and several ships were spotted in the Brest Estuary.     A Station Dance was held in the evening, a very good party. Five W.A.A.F. Officers came over from R.A.F. Exeter - a good time was had by all.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of October was signed by :- Flight Lieutenant Collcult.

 

No.276  Air Sea Rescue Squadron     ' B ' Flight :-

          2nd October    A section of Spitfire aircraft were scrambled on a practice search. The dinghy was located and one Spitfire aircraft orbited while the other located the Air Sea Rescue boats. The Air Sea Rescue boats were not located so another boat that was in the area was contacted and the dinghy picked up.

          7th October     A Spitfire aircraft carrying out a practice search was airborne at 1440 hours. The Spitfire aircraft was scrambled and after various vectors found the dinghy. A smoke float was dropped and the Spitfire went off in search for rescue boats, these were not located so the Spitfire returned and located the dinghy again which it orbited until relieved by another Spitfire, it then returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer landing at 1645 hours.

          10th October     Local flying was carried out with the Air Training Corps cadets in the afternoon.

          15th October     Two Spitfire aircraft were scrambled on a practice search and after several vectors from the Controlling Station reached the centre of the search area where they commenced to search for the dinghy. The dinghy was located south of the position given and rescue boats were contacted to pick the dinghy up, which they did. The two Spitfire aircraft then carried out air to air firing practice before returning to base.

          20th October     A section of Spitfire aircraft were ordered off from R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1130 hours to search three to four miles south of Bolt Head for a single engined aircraft which had been reported in the sea by a local Gun Site. The position was searched up to six miles out but nothing was seen. The section were recalled back to base by the Controller and they landed at 1215 hours.

          24th October     Flight Lieutenant Renvoize arrived at Squadron Headquarters from ' A ' Flight to assume command of the Squadron vice Squadron Littler on leave.

          25th October     An Anson aircraft was ordered off to search ten miles west of St. Agnes for lights reported during the night. A piece of red fabric thought at first to be a dinghy sail was sighted but this was probably an A.A. drogue.     A Walrus aircraft was ordered to R.A.F. Predannack for stand-by duties. At 1635 hours it was scrambled to search a position fifty miles, one hundred and ninety degrees from the Lizard, Cornwall with an escort of four Spitfire aircraft. An Anson aircraft from ' C ' Flight, R.A.F. Portreath was engaged on the same search and was spotted by the Walrus, but there were no signs of a dinghy in the sea or of an oil patch on the water. The Walrus landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1845 hours.

          29th October     Today instructions were received from Headquarters No.10 Group that the Spitfire aircraft from ' A ' Flight, R.A.F. Warmwell are to move to R.A.F. Portreath and the Anson aircraft are to move from R.A.F. Portreath to R.A.F. Harrowbeer and R.A.F. Warmwell. The move is to be carried out on 30/10/1943.

Thus the disposition of the Squadron's aircraft will be :-

                    R.A.F. Portreath  =  six Spitfires, two Walrus and two Ansons.

                    R.A.F. Harrowbeer  =  six Spitfires, two Walrus and two Ansons.

                    R.A.F. Warmwell  =  two Ansons and two Walrus.

          30th October     Aircraft and personnel from ' A ' Flight and ' C ' Flight today moved to R.A.F. Portreath and R.A.F. Warmwell respectively.

          31st October     Vey little operational flying this month and much of the practice flying has been directed at completing the Gunnery Syllabus, particular attention having been paid to cine camera exercises and air firing.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of October was signed by :- Squadron Leader J. M. Littler.

 

No.279  Air Sea Rescue Squadron :-

          2nd October     Hudson aircraft Y/279 was detailed to R.A.F. Predannack at 0940 hours on a search, but nothing was sighted so the aircraft returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer landing at 1450 hours.

          3rd October     A search by Hudson aircraft Y/279 was airborne at 0715 hours. At 1015 hours four unidentified twin engined aircraft were sighted two or three miles on the starboard beam. Nothing further was sighted so the Hudson aircraft returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer and landed at 1215 hours.     Hudson aircraft Y/279 was airborne again at 1748 hours on a search, but again nothing was sighted. On the return track the Hudson aircraft investigated an object which proved to be a smoke float. There was no radar bleep from it. Hudson aircraft Y/279 then landed at R.A.F. Predannack at 2255 hours.

          4th October     Two Hudson aircraft E/ 279 and N/279 were airborne at 1355 hours to carry out a search. At 1435 hours the Airborne Lifeboat fell from the bottom of Hudson aircraft N/279 - cause unknown, but it is under investigation. Fortunately a surface vessel was able to pick up the Airborne Lifeboat. Hudson aircraft E/279 and N/279 both returned safely to base at 1540 hours.

          7th October     Hudson aircraft N/279 was airborne at 1248 hours to carry out a search, but nothing was seen. The Hudson aircraft landed back at base at 1750 hours.          Hudson aircraft Y/279 took off at 1249 hours for an Air Sea Rescue search, nothing was sighted so the aircraft returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer landing at 1755 hours.

          19th October     A search was commenced at 0910 hours by a Hudson aircraft, but then had to be abandoned at 0955 hours due to bad weather. The Hudson aircraft landed back at base at 1045 hours.

          20th October     At 1305 hours Hudson Y/279 took off to carry out a search, nothing was sighted so the aircraft returned to base landing at 1812 hours.

          26th October     There was one rescue sortie today where Hudson aircraft Y/279 took off at 0810 hours to search in the vicinity of Skomer Island for an upturned ' J ' type dinghy and a dead body which had been sighted. A High Speed Launch was homed to pick these up. Numerous pieces of wreckage was sighted at St. Brides Bay. The Hudson aircraft returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer landing at 1300 hours.

          27th October     A rescue sortie was detailed at 0646 hours when Hudson aircraft Y/279 was detailed to search an area fifty miles west of Land's End, Cornwall. Nothing was seen and the aircraft landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1225 hours.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of October was signed by :- Flight Lieutenant W. Longdon.

 

No.453 Squadron :-

          9th October     At 1125 hours the Squadron moved from R.A.F. Perranporth to R.A.F. Bolt Head.     Nine Squadron Spitfire aircraft, plus one other aircraft were airborne from R.A.F. Bolt Head at 1440 hours in the role of escort cover to twenty four Mitchell bomber aircraft. They made rendezvous with the twenty four Mitchell bombers at Start Point. The formation crossed the coast west of Isle De Batz at 1529 hours and were over the target at 1532 hours. They then flew out at 1534 hours. Bombing by the Mitchell bombers took place through 9/10 cloud and instead of Guipavas Airfield they bombed Morlaix. The weather began to worsen as the formation headed for home. Owing to the weather worsening two pilots landed back at base, two others at R.A.F. Exeter and the remainder landing at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1640 hours where they had to stay the night.

          10th October     The boys who landed at R.A.F. Harrowbeer yesterday afternoon managed to return to base at 1530 hours having waited for the weather to improve, which even then was not too good.

The Squadron O.R.B. Form 540 for the month of October was signed by :- Flight Lieutenant E. A. R. Esau.

The Squadron O.R.B. Form 541 for the month of October was signed by :- Squadron Leader D. G. Andrews DFC.

 

~    ~    ~    ~

 

September  1943

Wing Commander J. Butterworth assumed command of R.A.F. Harrowbeer while the Hon. E. F. Ward left to go on leave preparatory to assuming his new duties at Headquarters Fighter Command.          Wing Commander E. F. Ward had been in command of R.A.F. Harrowbeer for two years.          The Station O.R.B. for September was signed by Wing Commander J. Butterworth.

 

Visitors to R.A.F. Harrowbeer included :- 

          Lord Sherwood  -  The Under Secretary of State

          Lord Wimborne  -  Parliamentary Private Secretary

          Group Captain Guest  -

          Brigadier C. R. Britten  -  Command Defence Officer

          Lieutenant Colonel A. Hargreaves  -  Group Defence Officer

          Sergeant McCartney  -  Group Sanitary Assistant

 

Weather 

          1st September     The weather today was completely non-operational. Very low cloud, rain and mist for most of the day.

          12th September     Today the weather was very stormy with high winds expected in the afternoon.

          17th September     Fine weather with good visibility.

          18th September     Typical Harrowbeer weather - rain, rain and still more rain. The rain started early on in the day with brighter periods later although visibility remained poor.

          19th September     No operational flying today on account of the poor weather conditions.

          20th September     A poor start to the day with much low cloud and from 1030 hours heavy rain continued to fall until 1515 hours.

          21st September     A fairly cool day. There was an 8/10th cloud ceiling at two thousand feet.

          22nd September     Quite a satisfactory morning apart from a thick haze which cleared later in the day resulting in good visibility.

          23rd September     Another good day at Harrowbeer !  A fine sunny day with unlimited visibility.

          24th September     Yet another good day.

          25th September     A moderate, cool day with much low cloud, gradually breaking up. There were a few bright periods and 5/10th cloud.

          26th September     A filthy morning, quite up to Harrowbeer's usual - heavy rain and thick patches of haze. As the day progressed the weather improved but the day remained cool with bright sunny periods allowing good visibility.

          27th September     A fairly good morning although there were patches of haze.

          28th September     Another filthy morning as far as the weather is concerned. Heavy rain for most of the day and 8/10th cloud. Visibility was fair but today was classed as a no flying day.

          29th September     The weather is again very poor and despite the unfavourable conditions only four of the aircraft that went to R.A.F. Predannack at first light were able to return to R.A.F. Harrowbeer. There was 8/10th cloud early on in the day and was later closing in as the day progressed.

          30th September     The month closes with bad weather. Yet another miserable day with no flying, 10/10th low cloud covering the hill tops.

 

From the Station O.R.B.

 

          7th September     Wing Commander J. Butterworth posted to this Station to take over command from Wing Commander the Hon E. F. Ward.

          9th September     Squadron Leader R. F. de Read posted to this Station for duty as Station Administration Officer vice Squadron Leader C. M. T. Hogg DSO.

          10th September     Wing Commander J. Butterworth reports for duty.         The Under Secretary of State ( Lord Sherwood ) accompanied by the Parliamentary Private Secretary ( Lord Wimborne ) and Group Captain Guest landed on the airfield on route to Headquarters No.19 Group. They returned at 1700 hours and went up to the Officer's Mess before returning to R.A.F. Hendon.

          15th September     ' Battle of Britain Colour Hoisting Parade ' attended by all ranks except those on essential operational duties. The Station Commander gave a short and inspired address.

          18th September     No.193 ( Typhoon ) Squadron, with No.3013 Echelon returned to this Station from R.A.F. Gravesend.

          21st September     No.266 ( Rhodesia ) Squadron ( Typhoon ) with No.3043 Echelon moved to this Station from R.A.F. Station Exeter.          Brigadier C. R. Britten - Command Defence Officer visited the Station with Lieutenant Colonel A. Hargreaves - Group Defence Officer and inspected the Flight of No.2738 R.A.F. Regiment.

          26th September     ' Battle of Britain Sunday ', a wet morning spoilt a one hundred per cent Church Parade, but inspite of this, the church was full and even the Padre was satisfied.

 

Physical Fitness and Entertainment for September 1943.

          This month has seen the beginning of the Winter sports season. Already great strides have been made in soccer and a good Station team is in progress of formation. There are numerous section matches being played and the running of the ' Jolliffe Cup ' competition as a league event has consolidated these.          Matches during September are as follows :-

Station Team :-     Played  -  3     Won  -  1     Lost  -  1     Drawn  -  1

Section Team :-     Four separate teams played five matches.

Rugby :-     This Station is combining with R.A.F. Mount Batten to form a joint rugby football team and the arrangement is working successfully.

Hockey :-     Practices are beginning soon and a fairly good fixtures list has been arranged.

Physical Training :-     P.T. Parades of the Tabloid Defence Course at present running on this Station has been successful, for example, men have volunteered to follow up their half hour compulsory P.T. by continuing the P.T. period with the next course, voluntarily. Men taking this course which runs from 0830 hours to 0910 hours state that they wish they could be allowed this P.T. per day. No.279 Air Sea Rescue Squadron continue to put in a full two and a half hours per week of P.T., but no other Squadron has made an organised effort to lay on P.T. for flying personnel.

( Average daily attendance - twenty.     Average hours / days spent in P.T. is two and a half hours ).

( Flying personnel attending - sixteen,     two and a half hours per week - No.279 Squadron ).

Boxing :-     The arrival of No.266 ( Rhodesia ) Squadron has brought two new boxers to the Station.  Three men are representing this Station at the R.A.F. meeting at R.A.F. Mount Batten on October 5th and it is hoped to stage an ATC show in October.

Entertainment :-     During September the following have taken place :-

E.N.S.A. Variety  -  2     E.N.S.A.  Plays  -  1     R.A.F. Symphony Orchestra  -  1 performance     Pioneer Corps Orchestra  -  1 performance     Recorded music programme  -  1     Dances  -  3

Note :-     The plays by E.N.S.A. companies are proving increasingly popular. This production in September " The Naughty Wife " was well received by a large audience.

Music :-     There is a steady interest in all forms of serious musical activity. Civilians were invited to attend the R.A.F Symphony Orchestra's concert, two hundred and fifty people were present.

 

Station Sick Quarters - Form 540

          The Form 540 for September was signed by Squadron Leader F. Constable, Senior Medical Officer.

          1st September     Strength of the Station :-  R.A.F.  =  1399     W.A.A.F.  = 396     Army  =  205     ATS  =  17          These strengths include Satellite Stations and Units ie :- R.A.F. Bolt Head, R.A.F. Hope Cove, No.2891 A.A. Squadron Dartmouth, also R.A.F. and W.A.A.F personnel of R.A.F. Station Bolt Tail which is being looked after re-medical treatment by the Medical Officer from R.A.F. Bolt Head.

          3rd September     Station personnel admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital week ending today :-  R.A.F.  =  5     W.A.A.F.  =  8     Army  =  0     ATS  =  0

          5th September     One Nursing Orderly was attached to R.A.F. Hendon on an Air Ambulance Course.          A cook ( Corporal ) from R.A.F. Harrowbeer was admitted to Swilly Isolation Hospital, Plymouth diagnosed with " Rubella ". All contact supervised and inspected daily.

          6th September     One Nursing Orderly attached to R.A.F. Halton on a Water Course.

          7th September     An ACW  Cook from the Airmen's Mess was admitted to the Station Sick Quarters and transferred to the Swilly Isolation Hospital, Plymouth, diagnosis " Diptheria ". A number of W.A.A.F. personnel were admitted to the Station Sick Quarters for week ending 10/9/1943, eight of these were remote contacts with " Diptheria " and detained for observation and exclusion.

          8th September     The Medical Officer of No.610 Squadron from R.A.F. Bolt Head detached for a Tropical Course to R.A.F. Halton.

          10th September     Strength of Station :-  R.A.F.  =  1209     W.A.A.F.  =  380     Army  =  ?     ATS  =  16

          Station personnel admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital week ending today :-  R.A.F.  =  14     W.A.A.F.  =  25     Army  =  0     ATS  =  0

          17th September     Strength of Station :- R.A.F.  =  1115     W.A.A.F.  =  378     Army  =  94     ATS  =  Nil

          Station personnel admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital week ending today :-  R.A.F.  =  6     W.A.A.F.  =  19     Army  =  1

          An LACW Cook was admitted to Swilly Isolation Hospital, Plymouth on 13/9/1943, diagnosis " Diptheria ".          Thirteen of the W.A.A.F. cases admitted for week ending 17/9/1943 were " remote contacts Diptheria " and all had developed Pyrexia before admission.

          18th September     The Group Sanitary Assistant ( Sergeant McCartney ) completed a three day inspection of R.A.F. Harrowbeer and R.A.F. Bolt Head.

          24th September     Strength of Station :-  R.A.F.  =  1621     W.A.A.F.  =  454     Army  =  105

          Station personnel admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital week ending today :-  R.A.F.  =  11     W.A.A.F.  =  8     Army  =  0

 

From the Squadron O.R.B.'s

 

No.193 Squadron :-

          16th September     While the Squadron was at R.A.F. Gravesend they received news that on the 16th September the Squadron was to return to R.A.F. Harrowbeer on Saturday. The news was received with that " sinking " feeling throughout the Squadron. It was hoped that any change would be to another Station in No.11 Group, or at least a fresh Station in No.10 Group.

          17th September     The Advance Party leave R.A.F. Gravesend for R.A.F. Harrowbeer.

          18th September     The Squadron reaches R.A.F. Harrowbeer to the typical old " Harrowbeer " weather, rain, rain and still more rain.          There was a great welcome from the Station Headquarters personnel and in particular from the new Station Commander to No.193 Squadron. This of course was greatly appreciated by all the troops.          Fourteen Typhoon aircraft had been flown to R.A.F. Harrowbeer from R.A.F. Gravesend.

          19th September     Not a very encouraging day.          Much activity everywhere, getting the " house " in order.

          20th September     Eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron took off for R.A.F. Predannack to take part in an operation from there, unfortunately it was aborted.

          22nd September     A fighter sweep was carried out today over the Brest area by eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron in conjunction with Typhoon IB aircraft of No.266 ( Rhodesia ) Squadron operating from R.A.F. Predannack. The aircraft took off at 1558 hours from R.A.F. Predannack on ' Ramrod 83 ', the target time was 1636 hours. All the aircraft set course for the Lizard, Cornwall passing there at 1604 hours and reaching Ushant at seventeen thousand feet at approximately 1631 hours. The aircraft then continued climbing reaching the target at seventeen thousand feet. The pilots saw other Typhoons, Spitfires and Mitchell bomber aircraft in the area. No.193 Squadron saw the Mitchell bombers making their bombing run, but saw no bomb bursts. The Squadron then crossed out at 1641 hours at Ile De Batz at fifteen to sixteen thousand feet. No ships or enemy aircraft were seen. There was an ineffective smoke screen and moderate flak over Brest which was too low to cause any damage. All aircraft landed back at base at 1715 hours.

          23rd September     Eight of our aircraft operating from R.A.F. Predannack again took part in two Ramrod operations with No.183 Squadron and No.266 ( Rhodesia ) Squadron. They were to act as escort on ' Ramrod 84 ' to No.183 Squadron's Bomphoons ( Typhoon aircraft loaded with bombs ). At 0830 hours, our Typhoon aircraft escorting the Bomphoons set course for the Lizard, Cornwall. They then passed Ushant, crossing the French coast at fifteen thousand feet. All bombs from the Bomphoons were dropped in the target area, four twin-engined aircraft are thought to have been destroyed by bombs on the ground. Dispersal and Hangars were seen to have been hit. There was a considerable amount of accurate flak. Weather :- no cloud. Visibility :- good, hazy over the sea. One Typhoon aircraft of No.266 Squadron went into the sea, trouble not known. One Bomphoon of No.183 Squadron was damaged by flak. No.193 Squadron Typhoons landed back at R.A.F. Predannack at 1005 hours.          A second operation was airborne at 1125 hours from R.A.F. Predannack consisting of eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron and eight Bomphoons of No.183 Squadron on ' Ramrod 85 '. The aircraft set course for the Lizard, Cornwall, then onto Ushant crossing the French coast at Casserret. Again considerable flak was experienced damaging four Bomphoons of No.183 Squadron. After the attack the aircraft returned on a reciprocal course. Weather :- no cloud. Visibility :- good, very hazy in mid-channel up to three to five thousand feet. All aircraft returned to R.A.F. Predannack at 1305 hours.          A third operation ( Ramrod 86 ) had been airborne at 1510 hours to escort Mitchell bomber aircraft to a target in France but they were recalled as the operation was cancelled. The aircraft landed back at base at 1530 hours.

          24th September     All serviceable aircraft left for R.A.F. Predannack taking part in another two Ramrods.          Eight Ttyhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron took off at 1710 hours from R.A.F. Predannack to take part in ' Ramrod 88 '. A course was set for the Lizard, Cornwall and then on a heading to the east of Ushant. The Typhoons then turned east passing north of Casseret and again turned north and patrolled the target area for approximately eight minutes at twenty thousand feet. The weather over the target area was 10/10th cloud, top at twelve thousand feet. There was much R/T chatter by another formation of aircraft. Bandits were reported near when No.193 Squadron was in the vicinity of Brest, but nothing was seen. There was no flak experienced and the Squadron crossed out over the coast at Vierge. The weather over the channel was 8/10th cloud at three thousand feet and the sea was calm. All No.193 Squadron Typhoon's landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer - six at 1835 hours, one at 1745 hours and one at 1750 hours.

          25th September     Most of the day was spent on synthetics.          Two Typhoon aircraft were scrambled at 1705 hours from stand by to intercept ' bogeys ' which proved to be Spitfire aircraft. They were then ordered to pancake almost immediately and the section returned to their previous state. Their landing time was 1715 hours.          Nine Typhoon aircraft too off just after 1900 hours for R.A.F. Predannack to again operate from there. They took off with the weather closing in rapidly. Just after their departure the weather clamped down completely.

          26th September     Eight of the nine Typhoon aircraft which had flown to R.A.F. Predannack on the 25th landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1132 hours. The other Typhoon aircraft remained behind to have two new wheels fitted, having had a little ' puncture ' trouble. This aircraft then took off and landed back at base at 1516 hours.          During the afternoon some air to air firing practice took place.

          27th September Today is the first opportunity the pilots have had since coming back to R.A.F. Harrowbeer to go on the " Link Trainer " as there are other Squadrons on the airfield all wasithing to make use of the " trainer ". The chances are that " No.193 Squadron " are to have little chance of spending much time there - worse still ! the Instructor arrives only to find the " Link Trainer " is u/s. So much for that !          The Commanding Officer and one other pilot flew over to R.A.F. Langley to have another inspection of the Tempest aircraft. As their inspection, through no fault of their own, finished up with a ' ground ' examination only, the next best thing was to fly ' something ' new. So, after talking to the pilot of a new modified Spitfire XII aircraft they each had a go in it. The ' Spitfire XII ' responded well in the air, and created a very favourable impression indeed.

          29th September     Eight Typhoon aircraft left at first light for R.A.F. Predannack, but owing to u/s weather the operation they were to take part in was aborted. In the afternoon, four of the Typhoons returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer. The other four Typhoons were detained at R.A.F. Predannack as the weather had clamped down entirely.

          30th September     More synthetics today as the weather was fairly miserable, this included ' range examination ' tests.          The month closes with bad weather.          The four Typhoon aircraft that remained at R.A.F. Predannack on the 29th are still there owing to the bad weather situation.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of September was signed by :- Squadron Leader G. W. Pete.

 

No.266 ( Rhodesia ) Squadron :-

          17th September     The Squadron is operating from R.A.F. Exeter at the present time and have just heard that No.266 Squadron and Echelon are to move to R.A.F. Harrowbeer. The move is to take place on Tuesday 21st September.

          18th September     Thirteen Typhoon aircraft took off to fly to R.A.F. Harrowbeer to take part from there in an offensive operation. Half way to R.A.F. Harrowbeer the flight was recalled as the operation had been cancelled.

          21st September     The road and rail parties left for R.A.F. Harrowbeer, but fourteen Typhoon aircraft had to fly to R.A.F. Predannack instead as they had to take part in an operation from there. The operation was cancelled so the Typhoon aircraft of No.266 Squadron flew to R.A.F. Harrowbeer.          The Squadron started settling down at R.A.F. Harrowbeer.          The weather seems a bit colder here and the billets will not be as warm as R.A.F. Exeter's.

          22nd September     Eight Typhoon aircraft along with eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron took part in a large operation today. Twelve Mitchell bomber aircraft, bombed Guipavas Aerodrome and our two Squadrons acted as ' fighter - sweep ' over the target five minutes after the bombers and their escorts to shoot down any Huns seen. We were flying at fifteen to twenty thousand feet, but saw no enemy aircraft although we were warned by Control that there were fifteen enemy aircraft in the area. There was slight / heavy flax experienced and one pilot on landing found his tail-plane had been slightly dented.          The Squadron continued unpacking and settling in.

          23rd September     No.266 Squadron took part in ' Ramrod 84 and 85 ' operating from R.A.F. Predannack on both occasions. Eight of our Typhoon aircraft along with eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron and eight Bomphoon aircraft of No.183 Squadron flew from R.A.F. Predannack and crossed the French coast at twelve thousand feet at Camaret after skirting Ushant. The Bomphoons bombed the target Poulmic successfully, probably destroying four twin-engined aircraft on the ground. No enemy aircraft were airborne. Moderate flak was experienced in the area. Flying Officer Lucas noticed his engine running rough on leaving the French coast possibly due to flak damage and had to bale out when thirty three miles off the Lizard, Cornwall. Everything worked perfectly, he judged his height from the water when coming down in ' chute ' by dropping a boot. Flying Officer Lucas was picked up by a Walrus aircraft and landed at R.A.F. Portreath. He returned back to base after tea none the worse for his wetting.

          24th September     Five Typhoon aircraft flew down to R.A.F. Predannack, on the way they were vectored after an ' X ' raid of five enemy aircraft over the sea south of Plymouth. Nothing was seen and the vector was soon cancelled.          Four Typhoon aircraft took part in a sweep over Guipavas without incident at twenty thousand feet.          Later four Typhoon aircraft with six Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron took part on a sweep over Brest at fifteen thousand feet, and although they turned to find some enemy aircraft which Control had warned them about they did not see anything and returned without incident to R.A.F. Harrowbeer.

          25th - 30th September     No operational flying during this period.          Practice flying was undertaken which consisted of formation flights, cine-camera gun practice, air to sea firing, tail chase and sector reconnaissance flights.          During the last three days of the month the weather was poor resulting in very little flying activity.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of September was signed by :- Squadron Leader P. W. Lefevre.

 

No.276  Air Sea Rescue Squadron     ' B ' Flight :-

          2nd September     A Walrus aircraft was ordered off from R.A.F. Exeter at 0710 hours to continue the search for a Mustang aircraft pilot who had baled out on the 30th August 1943. The Walrus aircraft flew on a vector of two hundred degrees from Bolt Head for forty two and a half minutes and reached the centre of the search area some sixty four miles from the coast. A number of aircraft were circling a dinghy. The Walrus landed on the sea and picked up the occupant of the dinghy who was the Flight Commander of No.16 Squadron. He did not appear to have suffered greatly from his three days in the dinghy, but was exceedingly glad to see the Walrus. The rescued pilot was flown by the Walrus to R.A.F. Exeter. The Walrus had no escort on the way out to the search position, but Spitfires, Mustangs, Typhoons and Beaufighters were in attendance during the journey back. Altogether one hundred and seventy seven aircraft were engaged on this search, three of which were shot down, two from No.616 Squadron and one from ' B ' Flight, while two FW190's were destroyed and one damaged by No.616 Squadron.

          3rd September     Squadron Leader R. F. Hamlyn AFC, DFM posted today to Headquarters No.10 Group pending disposal.

          4th September     Squadron Leader J. M. Littler posted to command from No.616 Squadron.

          5th September     Squadron Leader J. M. Littler reported for duty as Squadron Commander.

          6th September     A section of Spitfire aircraft were ordered off from R.A.F. Harrowbeer to search ten miles east of Budleigh Salterton for an aircraft reported in the sea. The section were recalled as the information is believed to be very doubtful. Nothing was seen in the area of the search.

          7th September     At 0630 hours two Spitfire aircraft were ordered off to search an area two hundred and eighty degrees off Portland Bill and seventeen miles out. Flashing lights had been reported by Coastguards. The area was searched thoroughly but nothing sighted. A section of Spitfire aircraft were ordered off to search a position off Berry Head, one hundred and ten degrees, twenty one miles out. Nothing was seen in the area and the section was recalled by operations.

          11th September     Wing Commander J. Butterworth, the new Station Commander visited No.276 A.S.R. Squadron Headquarters today.          Two replacement aircraft arrived today, but both aircraft have to be modified before they can be flown operationally in the Squadron.

          16th September     One Spitfire aircraft was ordered off from R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1720 hours to search off Prawle Point for a ditched Flying Fortress aircraft - a search was carried out in the area, nothing was seen. The Spitfire aircraft was later vectored to a position at Bolt Tail and arrived as the crew of a Flying Fortress were being transferred to a High Speed Launch. This aircraft landed back at base at 1840 hours. A Spitfire aircraft was ordered off at 1800 hours to search a position two miles north of Bolt Head. The aircraft was believed to be a Flying Fortress aircraft which was about to ditch into the sea. The Spitfire aircraft located the Flying Fortress aircraft and remained in the vicinity. The Spitfire aircraft was then sent off on various vectors to search for further aircraft that were believed to be in the sea, but nothing was seen. The Spitfire aircraft landed at R.A.F. Bolt Head at 1930 hours.          At 1805 hours Squadron Leader J. M. Littler was ordered off in a Spitfire aircraft on a continuation of the above sortie. He located the Flying Fortress aircraft and returned to base at 1825 hours.

          17th September     A section of Spitfire aircraft were ordered off from R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1445 hours to search a position two hundred degrees from the Lizard, Cornwall and twenty five minutes out. A search was carried out in the area without success.

          18th September     Two Spitfire aircraft while engaged on a practice dinghy drop and search saw the wing of an aircraft sticking out of the water approximately fifteen miles from Looe Island. One Spitfire aircraft orbited the wreckage while the other made an unsuccessful attempt to contact a rescue launch. The Spitfire aircraft returned and continued to orbit until relieved by a Fighter section of aircraft. The relieving section was able to contact the boats and guide them to the spot where the wreckage proved to be a twin engined aircraft. This rescue operation commenced at 1625 hours and ended with all aircraft back at base by 1930 hours.

          21st September     A Walrus aircraft practicing landings swung off the runway after it's first landing and then a wheel struck a ditch causing the aircraft to topple over.

          22nd September     A section of Spitfire aircraft were ordered off from R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 0700 hours to search a position two hundred degrees and two minutes out from Start Point. A thorough search was made in the area without success. A section was again ordered off at 1050 hours and another search  was carried out, but again nothing was sighted.

          23rd September     A section of Spitfire aircraft were ordered off from R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1335 hours to search one hundred and ninety degrees off Start Point and twelve minutes out. The area was searched thoroughly without success. Another section of Spitfire aircraft were ordered off to continue the above search, but again nothing was seen. This section landed at 1700 hours. A further section of Spitfire aircraft were airborne at 1715 hours on the same search, but without success.

          A large amount of the time during the month of September was spent on practice duties which included :- air tests, night flying, formation flying, dinghy drops and searches, sea landings, navigation exercises and air to air firing.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of September was signed by :- Squadron Leader J. M. Littler

 

No.279 Air Sea Rescue Squadron :- 

          2nd September     A Hudson aircraft took off at 0755 hours on a search from R.A.F. Harrowbeer with a Typhoon aircraft as escort. Nothing was sighted and the Hudson landed back at base at 0945 hours.

          4th September     Flight Lieutenant Stevens and crew left R.A.F. Bircham Newton in Hudson N/279 for R.A.F. Harrowbeer with a new airborne lifeboat.

          9th September     Two Hudson aircraft were airborne at 0635 hours on a search. One hour was  spent searching in the given area but nothing was sighted. The Hudsons returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer landing at 1216 hours.

          18th September     Two Hudson aircraft were ordered off at 0705 hours on a C.L.A. search south of Fasnet Rock, west of Land's End, Cornwall. Nothing was sighted and the aircraft returned to base landing at 1235 hours.

          23rd September     A Hudson aircraft took off at 0635 hours on a search west of the Scillies from the Squadron Headquarters detachment. Apart from an oil patch, nothing of interest was sighted. The aircraft returned to base at 1210 hours.

          24th September Two Hudson aircraft were airborne at 0652 hours to continue the search west of the Scillies today. Only oil streaks and patches were seen in the area. A negative report was made to two High Speed Launches before setting course for base landing at 1245 hours. This search was led by a American pilot, First Lieutenant Coale.

          27th September     A Hudson aircraft was airborne from R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 0745 hours for a search off the Iles De Bas, but just before reaching the area an unidentified plane was seen ahead and a course was set for base. In a few minutes however their escort of eight Typhoon aircraft was sighted and a course re-set for position forty nine degrees and nine minutes north and four degrees and twelve minutes west. A Walrus aircraft was sighted on the water by a dinghy with fighter aircraft circling overhead.  After seeing the Walrus aircraft an airborne course was set for R.A.F. Harrowbeer, landing at 0945 hours.          A Hudson aircraft took off from R.A.F. Harrowbeer with an airborne lifeboat attached on a search, but had to force land at R.A.F. Predannack thirty minutes later owing to a u/s turret. Headquarters No.19 Group gave instructions to the pilot to return to base. This was done.

          28th September     Two Hudson aircraft were ordered off on a search. Hudson N/279 carrying an airborne lifeboat. Nothing was sighted.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of September was signed by :- Wing Commander B. G. Corry DFC.       

 

~    ~    ~    ~

 

August  1943

Wing Commander the Hon. E. F Ward was the Commanding Officer for the month of August 1943 at R.A.F. Harrowbeer and he signed the Operation Record Book.

 

Visitors to R.A.F. Harrowbeer included :-

          Wing Commander Oakley-Beutler OBE  -  District Inspecting Officer for the Air Training Corps.

          Flight Lieutenant Deemy D.T.T. ( Films ).

          Air Chief Marshal Sir Robert Brooke-Popham  -  GCVO, etc.

          Squadron Leader Hardy  -  Headquarters No.19 Group

          Squadron Leader Lloyd-Jones  -  Headquarters No.19 Group

 

Weather

          1st August     A wet and misty day, very miserable. Heavy rain - low cloud and haze about almost down to the deck. The weather failed to clear all day.

          2nd August     A poor start to the day, rain, low cloud and thick haze, by 1330 hours the weather had cleared considerably.

          3rd August     The weather today for a change was quite favourable. Even the weather immediately over Harrowbeer remained moderate allowing a certain amount of practice flying to take place.

          4th August     The weather was mediocre early on with low patches of cloud and pockets of ground haze. At 1500 hours the weather clamped down completely. No flying. Torrential rain in the evening.

          5th August     The weather was fair with low cloud and a slight haze. At about 1130 hours the weather began to deteriorate and was completely clamped down by 1200 hours. This remained for the rest of the day - heavy rain, fog and half a gale blowing.

          6th August     Another poor beginning to the day, showers of rain and haze. Visibility early on was two to three miles.

          7th August     A fair start to the day, although there was some thick low cloud about. Visibility was about four miles.

          8th August     A moderate morning gradually closing in as the day progressed.

          9th August     A fairly good morning continuing throughout the day.

          10th August     It was a filthy start to the day, fog right down on the deck. Visibility was about two hundred yards. By the afternoon the weather cleared up which allowed a good amount of practice flying to take place.

          11th August     Another poor start to the day, but by 1000 hours the weather had started to clear.

          12th August     Quite a nice morning today, the pilots enjoying practice flying and operations once again.

          13th August     A miserable day on the Station, thick low cloud and rain storms.

          14th August     Another poor start to the day although the haze seemed to be lifting as the day progressed.

          15th August     A good day today weather-wise which pleased the pilots.

          16th August     Again quite a good day all round.

          17th August     Excellent weather which allowed plenty of flying to take place.

          28th August     The weather today was very poor resulting in no flying all day.

 

From the Station O.R.B.

 

          2nd August     The Station Commander visited R.A.F. Bolt Head today.

          7th August     The Air Training Corps camp which arrived on the Station on 31st July and was attended by four Officers, one Warrant Officer and fifty eight cadets of No.357 Squadron, Wivelscombe, four cadets of No.1169 Squadron, Exeter and six cadets of No.339 Squadron, Paignton dispersed today. ( see Appendix ' A ' )               A second party of A.T.C. cadets assembled on the Station today, consisting of two Officers and twenty eight cadets of No.1120 Squadron, Torquay, one Officer and twenty one cadets of No.2087 Squadron, Holsworthy and one Officer and sixteen cadets of No.2101 Squadron, Winkleigh.

          8th August     Twelve Officers arrived on the Station and were attached for the purpose of undergoing a course at the Eggbuckland Operations School.

          9th August     Wing Commander Oakley-Beulter OBE - District Inspecting Officer for the Air Training Corps inspected the A.T.C. camp during the morning.          Flight Lieutenant Deemy D.T.T. ( T. Films ) visited the Station in connection with the installation of a 35mm projector in the Station Gymnasium.

          13th August     Air Chief Marshal Sir Robert Brookes-Popham, GCVO, etc. visited the Station and inspected the A.T.C. camp, he was accompanied by Wing Commander Oakley-Beulter OBE.

          14th August     The A.T.C. cadets that arrived for Summer camp on 7th August dispersed today.          A further party consisting of one Officer and seventeen cadets of No.2011 Squadron, Crediton arrived in camp to undergo training for one week.

          17th August     No.193 Squadron moved to R.A.F. Gravesend today.

          19th August     Major H. Moorland who is to relieve Major F. J. Gaywood as L.D.A. made a visit to the Station to report his arrival.

          21st August     One Officer and seventeen A.T.C cadets of No.2011 Squadron, Crediton left today on completion of their training.

          22nd August     A manning exercise ( Grouse ) was carried out today. ( see Appendix ' B ' )

          24th August     Major F. J. Gaywood MC on relief by Major H. Moorland reported his departure today.

          25th August     A second manning exercise ( Grouse ) was held. This exercise and that of the 11nd August were carried out under instructions received from Headquarters Fighter Command. ( see Appendix ' B ' )

          31st August     The usual entertainments and sports activities have taken place on the Station during the month.  ( see Appendix ' C ' )          The detachment of No.286 Squadron consisting of one Officer, one Warrant Officer and ten other ranks left the Station today.

 

 

Appendix  ' A '

 

Summary of the Air Training Corps Summer Camp

July 31st  -  7th August  1943

R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer

From :- Flying Officer G. W. Rowse A.T.C. Camp Commandant.

 

Strength :- The camp opened with a total of :- four Officers, one Warrant Officer and sixty eight cadets.

Site :- Cadets and Officers were accommodated in tents on the Communal Site, ample tents and space being available. Unfortunately on the 4th August there was a heavy rain storm, and it was found necessary to disperse the cadets to huts on Sites 6, 7 and 8.

Parades :- Divine Service was attended by Officers and cadets on Sunday morning, and during the week training instruction was adhered to as far as possible.

Training :- Every advantage was taken to the facilities which the Station had to offer and sincere appreciation is given to the Station personnel of their assistance.

Flying :- On Thursday 4th August Flying Officer C. E. Murrell arrived with a Domine seven seater aircraft and although flying was attempted through unfavourable weather on that afternoon and Friday morning, by the afternoon of the latter day sixty one cadets, one Warrant Officer and four Officers had flown short flights, there being no more cadets available or eligible.

Sickness :-The general health of the cadets was very satisfactory, there being two cases of very minor illness, one case of slightly sprained ankle and another cadet was taken to the Sick Dispersal Quarters and detained with a badly sprained ankle.

General :- Although the weather was generally unfavourable, frequent, lasting rain storms interfering with sports and games, the opinion of all the Officers and cadets was that they had a really good time.

Station Commander's Inspection and address :- At 1100 hours on Saturday morning Wing Commander the Hon. E. F. Ward inspected the cadets, later taking the salute at a march past.

Activities and training consisted of :- Link Trainer practice, parachute drill, dinghy drill, rifle and shooting instruction, time at the Flight Dispersals, time in the Flight Hangars and the Armoury. The cadets also underwent route marches, physical training and bathing.

Flying Officer   G. H. Rowes

Camp Commandant

 

 

Appendix  ' B '

 

Exercise  ' Grouse '

 

The Air Officer Commanding Fighter Command ordered that two one hundred per cent manning exercises to be held during August 1943 :- one by day and one by night.

On Tuesday 17th August a preliminary warning was issued. Personnel were told there would be two exercises between the 21st and 31st August, both to be known as exercise ' Grouse '. No preliminary warning would be given and action station positions were to be taken up immediately.

At 1037 hours on Sunday 22nd August the Officer in Charge issued exercise ' Grouse ' over the tannoy. Within a few minutes men were moving in all directions and by the end of thirty five minutes the R.A.F. Regiment posts and all localities were reported as fully manned. Umpires, including the Commanding Officer visited all localities, inspected arrangements for demolition and some went through the buildings to see that they all had turned out. Only one or two ' column dodgers ' were found.

At 1230 hours the Commanding Officer issued exercise ' Grouse ' stand-down on the tannoy, personnel returned to their normal duties.

 

Night  exercise  ' Grouse '

 

At 0430 hours on Wednesday 25th August about one hour before first light the Commanding Officer issued exercise ' Grouse ' again. There was a short pause while personnel dressed and then various sites burst into life. Black-out precautions were not good and doors could be seen opening with light blazing out. Most men had no difficulty in finding their positions although there was too much talking. At 0510 hours, forty minutes from the initial warning, localities and posts were reported that they were fully manned.

Umpires and the Commanding Officer carried out an inspection as before.

During both exercises W.A.A.F. personnel manned first aid posts, clearing centres and helped to assist at the cook-house.

Major Moorland  LDA

 

Sports  and  Entertainment

Physical Fitness :- Outside activities have been greatly hampered by bad weather and the sports meeting arranged for the 28th August had to be cancelled. It was found possible however to play their Station cricket matches during the month, two of which were won and one lost.

Inter-section seven a side cricket matches were continued on a knock out basis. The teams in the final were the R.A.F. Regiment and the P.T.I.'s and Police. The R.A.F. Regiment won their match by an easy margin.

Badminton continues to be plated in the gym and tennis when the weather permits, on courts kindly loaned by local people.

Voluntary P.I. takes place most evenings in the gymnasium, mainly in boxing, medicine ball work and athletic training.

Entertainment

Cinema Shows :- There were five showings including " Eagle Squadron " and " This Gun for Hire ".

ENSA  Variety :- Only one show this month.

Concert Parties :- ( other than ENSA )   Two shows including our own Station Concert Party " The Edwardians " and the Army Concert Party " The Bombshells ".

Dances :- A total of four during the month.

Discussion Group :-  " The BBC in Wartime " led by a BBC public relations officer.

A. R. Williams

Physical Fitness Officer.

 

 

Station Sick Quarters - Form 540

               The Form 540 for August was signed by Squadron Leader F. Constable, Senior Medical Officer.

 

          1st August     Strength of Station including R.A.F. Bolt Head :-     R.A.F.  = 1859     W.A.A.F.  =  386     Army  =  168     ATS  =  15

          6th August     Station personnel admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital week ending today :- R.A.F.  =  9     W.A.A.F.  =  5     Army  =  1

One W.A.A.F. with a case of Diptheria admitted to Swilly Isolation Hospital, Plymouth.

          13th August     Station personnel admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital week ending today :- R.A.F.  =  15     W.A.A.F.  =  6     Army  =  0

          20th August     Station personnel admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital week ending today :- R.A.F.  =  0     W.A.A.F.  =  10     Army  =  3

          20th August     A W.A.A.F. from the Station Headquarters was involved in a bicycle accident when cycling down a steep hill ( Milton Combe ). Her injuries included concussion and a fractured skull. She was admitted to the Prince of Wales Hospital, Plymouth and placed on the dangerously ill list 21/8/1943. Placed on the seriously ill list 24/8/1943 and removed from the list on 26/8/1943. Her progress is favourable.

          22nd August     A Nursing Orderly from the Station Headquarters is attached to R.A.F. Hendon for an Ambulance Course of one weeks duration.

          27th August     Station personnel admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital week ending today :- R.A.F.  =  7     W.A.A.F.  =  3     Army  =  0

One W.A.A.F. with a case of Diptheria admitted to the City Isolation Hospital, Plymouth.

          Strength of Station including R.A.F. Bolt Head :- R.A.F.  =  1397     W.A.A.F.  =  338     Army  =  205     ATS  =  16

 

From the Squadron O.R.B.'s

No.183 Squadron :-

          1st August     New establishment for Typhoon ( Ground Attack ) Squadrons - takes effect from this day. It reduces the establishment to eleven Officers ( including the Adjutant, Medical Officer and Intelligence Officer ) and thirty four other ranks.

               Today was a wet and misty day, there was nothing else to do but submit to a ' Recognition Test '. The results were quite satisfactory.          In the evening a signal was received posting the Squadron and Echelon to R.A.F. Tangmere.

          2nd August     So once again the Squadron begins the process of packing up, recalling people from leave, drawing up movement orders, fixing up details with the Movement Control Officer. All this was done with the minimum of panic.          During the day there was a shipping reconnaissance ordered for the Squadron to carry out. Four Typhoon bomber aircraft were escorted by six Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron which flew at zero feet to the Sept Isles and along the coast to the Isles Vierge but nothing was seen so the aircraft returned to base. The weather was 2 - 3/10 cloud at three thousand feet. Visibility was thirty miles and the sea slightly choppy.

          3rd August     Eight Typhoon aircraft flew to R.A.F. Predannack for a bombing operation against Maupertus Aerodrome. The operation started at 0925 hours. Eight Typhoon bomber aircraft were armed up, each with two - five hundred and fifty pound multi-cluster, instantaneous bombs. No.183 Squadron Typhoon bomber aircraft were escorted by No.193 Squadron and No.266 Squadron. The aircraft flew at sea level and soon flew into thick channel fog, it was decided to abandon the operation. All aircraft returned safely to base.          In the evening there was a party at Bere Alston to celebrate firstly a Flight Lieutenant of the Squadron being awarded the DFC and secondly to bid farewell to R.A.F. Harrowbeer, which we found a most comfortable Station.

          4th August     The main party let by rail at 0840 hours, the Typhoon aircraft were flown at 1130 hours and a few made the journey by road.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of August was signed by :- Squadron Leader Gowers and Pilot Officer S. I. Williams ( Intelligence Officer ).

 

No.193 Squadron :-

          1st August     Today was a miserable day with heavy rain, low cloud and a haze almost down on the deck. The whole Squadron once again spent most of the morning brushing up on their high standard of aircraft recognition.          There was no operational flights today from Harrowbeer.

          2nd August     The weather today was again bad, so the morning was spent on synthetics and intelligence work.          Fortunately the weather cleared up in the afternoon allowing flying practice to resume.          Six aircraft took off about 1845 hours as escort on an armed shipping reconnaissance, which unfortunately proved to be uneventful.

          3rd August     At 0625 hours, six Typhoon aircraft left R.A.F. Harrowbeer for R.A.F. Predannack to take part in a ' Circus ' operation from there. The aircraft were airborne from R.A.F. Predannack by 0920 hours, but landed back there again after about an hour as the weather was u/s over the English Channel.          Two patrols were carried out in the evening. The first was where two Typhoon aircraft were detailed off at 2015 hours on a normal patrol. The aircraft were then vectored onto ' bogeys '  thirty miles south west of Plymouth, which proved to be eight Spitfire aircraft, they also saw a convoy leaving Plymouth and one Hurricane aircraft ( flying north ) fifteen miles south of the Eddystone Lighthouse. The patrol were then were vectored onto a ' bogey ' on the south side, but the plot had vanished. The weather was 7/10ths at eight thousand feet over the sea and 4/10ths over land. Visibility was eight to ten miles and the sea calm. The section landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 2135 hours.          The second patrol of the evening was uneventful.

          5th August     Flying practice was carried out as far as was possible, but on a limited scale owing to the poor serviceability of the aircraft. About 1139 hours the weather began to deteriorate, finishing up with heavy rain, fog and half a gale blowing.

          6th August     Another poor day with the weather.     Lots of synthetics today and fifteen pilots took the official ' Aircraft Recognition Test '.     Aircraft serviceability still bad.

          7th August     There was practice flying today as far as serviceability would allow. During an air test the Commanding Officer gave a really superb example of the capabilities of the Typhoon aircraft, once the pilot has mastered the aircraft.          The Squadron was on a state of readiness from 1400 hours and at dispersal it was evident that the Commanding Officer's display had cheered the troops up no end.

          8th August     In view of the extra hours put in recently by the Ground Echelon, in a special effort to get new machines fitted quickly and therefore have more serviceable aircraft available the Commanding Officer and Flight Commanders agreed that it would be a sound idea to invite the Echelon to the " Leg of Mutton " ( local Public House ) tonight for a little celebration in appreciation of their efforts. After the bar closed, some of the Officers proceeded to the Mess to continue the party while the Commanding Officer and the remainder of the Officers went direct to the hangar to render a little ' practicable ' assistance there. Unfortunately they spoiled their good work by leaving huge steams of light blazing from the hangar doors, etc. At about mid-night the ' hangar section ' then proceeded to the Officer's Mess.

          9th August     The Squadron was on state from 1400 hours and there was one scramble while they were on stand-by. No enemy aircraft were seen and the section returned to base.

         10th August     The day started very badly with visibility only about two hundred yards. This was disappointing as high hopes were held that sufficient serviceable aircraft would be available to get some real flying practice in. The weather cleared by the afternoon and practice flying was able to be carried out, culminating with a realistic show in the evening in which ten Typhoon aircraft ( yes ten aircraft ) took part. This was a good effort as only once on May 1st has the Squadron been in a position to put more than ten aircraft in the air at the same time.

          11th August     The Squadron was on state from 1300 hours. There were three uneventful scrambles in the evening. One of these scrambles was when two Typhoon aircraft were scrambled at 2050 hours to patrol the Lizard Point, Cornwall area, but this proved uneventful. They saw two convoys, one off the Lizard and one off Plymouth. The weather was 3/10th cloud at two thousand feet and a haze at six thousand feet. Visibility was good below six thousand feet. The Typhoon aircraft landed back at base at 2200 hours.

          12th August     At 1039 hours six aircraft took off for R.A.F. Predannack to act as escort to bomber aircraft. The target was - Brest / Guipavas, but they returned before crossing the French coast as the weather was u/s.          The No.193 Squadron rifle team won the Station Challenge Trophy today. Some good shooting took place in today's final which No.193 Squadron won by a margin of twenty two points. This called for another celebration which started in the " Leg of Mutton " again.

          13th August     A miserable day. Thick low cloud and rainstorms. Synthetic training when possible and in the afternoon aircraft recognition and combat film viewing.          Flying Officer Cassie returned from the ' Low Level Attack Course ' at Milford.

          15th August     Six Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron operating from R.A.F. Portreath made a sweep over Brest. The aircraft were ordered to R.A.F. Portreath to act as escort on the sweep in the Brest area along with No.266 Squadron. At 1455 hours the six Typhoon aircraft set a course from the Lizard, Cornwall and commenced their climb as detailed. They saw the bomber aircraft and escort wing to the south west of the Brest Peninsular. In order to wait for the bombers to make their approach, the Squadron turned one hundred and eighty degrees towards the French coast. They crossed the French coast at fourteen thousand feet, levelled off at sixteen thousand feet and proceeded some ten miles south east of Brest. The aircraft then turned starboard towards the target, turned to starboard again, diving down as ordered to five thousand feet. During this diving turn, No.266 Squadron lost contact with No.193 Squadron which crossed the coast at five thousand feet. Blue leader saw one FW190 German enemy aircraft well astern of the formation, which apparently turned away. Visibility was unlimited, smoke floats could be seen on the sea. It was not until the next day that the Squadron found out that the operation had been cancelled. Five of the Typhoons landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer between 1610 hours and 1630 hours. Blue leader landed at R.A.F. Predannack owing to a shortage of fuel.          Two sections were scrambled at 1930 hours, but proved uneventful.       More practice flying carried out during the day much to the delight of the pilots.          An advance party of No.193 Squadron moved to R.A.F. Gravesend during the day.

          17th August     Eleven Typhoon aircraft took off for their new base - R.A.F. Gravesend, Essex.          The posting pleased all types, as usual some did the journey ( from R.A.F. Harrowbeer to R.A.F. Gravesend ) by rail and some by road. The weather proved excellent which helped matters considerably.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of August was signed by :- Squadron Leader G. W. Petre.

 

No.276  Air Sea Rescue Squadron     ' B ' Flight :-  

          1st August     A congratulatory message addressed to all Air Sea Rescue Squadrons received today from the Air Officer Commanding in Command of Fighter Command as a result of the rescue of over one hundred airmen from the North Sea.

          2nd August     ' B ' Flight were ordered to stand-by while Typhoon aircraft carried out a shipping reconnaissance.

          3rd August     Flight Sergeant V. Dorman who was shot down on 7/6/1943 during operations, was to-day reported as a Prisoner of War in a letter received from him, he states he was attacked by FW 190's ( German aircraft ) and shot down, but managed to get into his dinghy just of the Sept Isles. He was in his dinghy for seven days when he made the coast of Guernsey, where he was captured.

          4th August     No operational flying from R.A.F. Harrowbeer. The weather is very poor with torrential rain in the evening.

          5th August     Information was to-day received from Headquarters Fighter Command, that a new establishment ( WAR/FC/653A ) had been prepared for the Squadron to bring us into line with other Air Sea Rescue Units. Many increases in personnel are included, particularly in the ' Fitter ' Trades which has been a source of most of our ' groans ' to Group Headquarters.

          10th August     Squadron Leader Lloyd-Jones and Squadron Leader Hardy from Headquarters No.19 Group visited the Squadron Headquarters to-day. The object of the visit being the ditching of aircraft.

          12th August     A section of Spitfire aircraft was ordered off from ' B ' Flight at 0620 hours to search for a raider shot down in the sea after the raid on Plymouth the previous evening. The position being one hundred and ninety nine degrees True, from Hope Cove, ten miles south west of Bolt Head for a JU88 ( German aircraft ). The area was searched thoroughly but only a large patch of oil was sighted, and boats were circling the spot. The search was later resumed at 1040 hours but again without positive results. The Spitfire aircraft were then vectored to thirty miles south west of Bolt Head, where returning bomber aircraft from the previous evening had reported lights and an aircraft in flames diving towards the sea. This area was also searched but without result.

          14th August     Night flying practice was carried out by Spitfire aircraft from ' A ' Flight - R.A.F. Warmwell. This is the first time night flying practice had been carried out by the Squadron, although many searches have been completed at night.

          15th August     A practice dinghy drop and search was carried out as one of the exercises for the day. A Spitfire aircraft had dropped a dinghy into the sea about mid-morning. At 1030 hours two Spitfire aircraft took off to search for the dinghy, but they could not find it. At 1300 hours a Walrus aircraft followed by two Spitfires at 1310 hours were ordered off to search for the dinghy ( the Spitfires to act as escort to the Walrus ). This search lasted about two hours but again the dinghy could not be found. It was thought that the dinghy on touching the water must have opened upside down and sank before the searching aircraft had reached the area.

          16th August     This afternoon the role of the Squadron was changed from Air Sea Rescue to normal day fighter, and the Spitfires were ordered to ' advance readiness ' to carry out anti-rhubarb patrols. Unfortunately no scrambles resulted from this sudden change.

          18th August     Four Spitfire aircraft and two Walrus aircraft were ordered to R.A.F. Gravesend to re-enforce No.277 Air Sea Rescue Squadron there. All aircraft flew direct with the exception of Flight Sergeant Sotheron-Estcourt who landed at R.A.F. Warmwell and handed the aircraft over to another pilot who flew it on to R.A.F. Gravesend.

          19th August     ' B ' Flight and an Anson aircraft from R.A.F. Portreath operating from R.A.F. Harrowbeer were ordered on stand-by duties while the Ibsley Wing of Spitfires swept an area north east of Brest.

          22nd August     This morning ' B ' Flight personnel were engaged on a Station Defence Exercise which lasted until noon. All positions were manned within the given time and later inspected by the Local Defence Advisor.   ( Exercise Grouse )

          25th August     At 0545 hours a Spitfire aircraft was ordered to fly to R.A.F. Portreath for stand-by duties. At 0920 hours the Spitfire was ordered off from R.A.F. Portreath to search a position forty eight miles north of Land's End, Cornwall for a Flying Fortress aircraft crew. After searching for one and a half hours, a dinghy with six occupants and one clinging to the side of it was sighted. A smoke float was dropped and the Spitfire continued to orbit for half an hour when it had to return to R.A.F. Portreath. An Anson aircraft and a Walrus aircraft from ' C ' Flight were also orbiting and directing boats to the spot. The Spitfire returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer after completion of the rescue sortie at 1255 hours.          In preparation for the continuation of last nights search by ' C ' Flight, one Spitfire aircraft from ' B ' Flight and two from ' A ' Flight were ordered to R.A.F. Portreath just after first light this morning. The Spitfires were airborne at 0640 hours together with an Anson aircraft from ' C ' Flight. At 0729 hours the Anson spotted the dinghy, but again lost it due to very bad weather conditions. It was however spotted again at 1037 hours by an Anson ( Welder 46 ) who remained and orbited the dinghy. They also contacted the Walrus aircraft searching in the vicinity and instructed the Walrus to contact Air Sea Rescue launches. The Walrus made contact with the launches and gave them a bearing, then led them to the dinghy. At 1117 hours the boats picked up seven of the crew and took them to Padstow. Three of them were in a very exhausted condition. The search was then continued for the other members of the Flying Fortress aircraft crew who were in their Mae Wests only, but without success. During the search Flying Officer Hosking in his Anson aircraft ditched into the sea owing to engine trouble. All five occupants of the Anson were in their dinghy for about four hours before they were picked up by a private motor launch from Portreath with a party including the Senior Controller from R.A.F. Portreath.          Information was received today from Headquarters No.10 Group that since most of the units flying is carried out within range of the enemy's short range fighter aircraft, the Squadron is now classed as fully operational and flying time will count as fully operational.

          26th August     No flying from any of the Flights to-day.

          27th August     Instructions received from Headquarters Fighter Command that in view of the Squadron now being fully operational Form 765A ( Operations Statistical Summary ) would be rendered as from 1st September 1943 instead of Form 765B ( Operations Statistical Summary Non-operational Units ).

          28th August     No flying from any of the Flights to-day. Weather very poor.

          29th August     The ' Maintenance Flight ' of the Squadron to-day took over new hangar accommodation on the aerodrome.

          30th August     A section of Spitfire aircraft were ordered off to search two hundred and twenty eight degrees sixty four miles from Bolt Head for a Mustang aircraft pilot, who had baled out as the result of enemy action. A thorough search was carried out, then a new position fifteen miles south was given. The search continued but without success. The Spitfires landed at R.A.F. Warmwell.

          31st August     At 0755 hours this morning a section of Spitfire aircraft were ordered off from R.A.F. Harrowbeer to continue yesterdays search, position two hundred and eight degrees and twenty seven minutes one hundred and eighty ASI from Bolt Head. On the way out to the position two separate sections of Spitfire aircraft were seen returning on reciprocal. At 0847 hours the centre of the search area was reached and a strip search commenced. At approximately 0925 hours the section was attacked by four FW190 enemy aircraft from about the same level and to port. Sergeant Ewens was flying as No.2 to Flight Sergeant Sotheron-Estcourt in line abreast at about three hundred feet. He shouted to his No.1 warning him of the attacking FW190's and as he himself was attacked he did a steep climbing turn to the left towards the attacking aircraft and made for the clouds. Flight Sergeant Sotheron-Estcourt appeared not to have heard the warning and No.1 was last seen trailing smoke and about to ditch into the sea. Coming out of the cloud again Sergeant Ewens circled the spot and saw a long trail of oil and a large patch of oil. He dropped his dinghy into the middle of the oil and asked Operations for a ' fix ', he then headed back to base. His aircraft was cannon shelled and machine gunned in the fuselage and tail, despite a bullet hole in the port tyre he made an excellent landing without further damage to the aircraft. At 1115 hours the Walrus aircraft was ordered off as the dinghy had been sighted again. Owing to enemy activity in the area the Walrus was recalled to base landing at 1315 hours. It was ordered off again at 1930 hours but before it could get to the centre of the search it was too dark to try and find the dinghy. The Walrus landed at R.A.F. Exeter at 2145 hours.    Flight Sergeant Sotheron-Estcourt is missing as a result of these operations.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of August was signed by :-  J. Renvoize   Flight Lieutenant

 

No.279  Air Sea Rescue Squadron :- 

          2nd August     An aircraft took off from R.A.F. Predannack at 1120 hours and given an escort of Mustang aircraft. ( The search area is not given in the O.R.B. ). A big patch of oil was seen but the search brought no concrete results. On the return flight the aircraft landed at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1440 hours.

          11th August     At 0940 hours two Hudson aircraft were detailed off on a search, nothing was sighted and the aircraft landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1405 hours.

          21st August     At 1700 hours a Hudson aircraft was airborne for an Air Sea Rescue search but nothing was sighted. The Hudson landed at R.A.F. Predannack at 2050 hours.

          30th August     Two Hudson aircraft took off from R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1520 hours on a search, but were recalled with nothing being seen, they landed at 1750 hours back at base.          Another search was carried out at 1925 hours but again nothing was found, this aircraft landed at R.A.F. Predannack at 2125 hours.

          31st August     The Hudson aircraft that landed at R.A.F. Predannack on the 30th was airborne at 1125 hours and flew to R.A.F. Bolt Head where it picked up an escort of eight Spitfire aircraft to carry out a search for a dinghy off the French coast. Nothing was sighted and the Hudson aircraft landed at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1320 hours.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of August was signed by :- Squadron Leader Fitchew

 

No.286  ( Army Air Co-operation ) Squadron :- 

           3rd August     Pilot Officer R. Martin proceeded to R.A.F. Harrowbeer to command the detachment there.

          31st August     Squadron Leader F. P. Joyce visited R.A.F. Exeter and R.A.F. Harrowbeer detachments to assist with the move to R.A.F. Exeter of the R.A.F. Harrowbeer detachment.

          The latter detachment will cease to exist today.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of August was signed by :- Flight Lieutenant P. P. Godfrey

 

          There were no traces of No.286 A.A.C. Squadron's Form 540 or Form 541 for the month of August.

 

No.453 Squadron :- 

          19th August     No.453 Squadron were operating out of R.A.F. Perranporth and took off at 1640 hours with eleven Squadron Spitfire aircraft as a freelance Wing for Boston bomber aircraft doing reconnaissance work in the Brest area. They set course at 1650 hours and flew at zero feet until 1713 hours. The formation started to climb on a course of two hundred degrees and crossed at Plouescat at fourteen thousand feet at 1727 hours. Then a wide orbit was made at north Guipavas and a further orbit of the Pontsuval / Plouescat area, they then set a course of twenty eight degrees for home base losing height slowly and crossing in north west Portland Bill at one thousand feet and all aircraft landing back at base at 1755 hours except for one pilot who landed at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1755 hours with fuel tank trouble and one pilot who landed at R.A.F. Exeter short of fuel. No. incidents took place on the operation.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of August was signed by :- Squadron Leader K. M. Barclay

 

 

~     ~     ~     ~

 

July  1943 

Wing Commander the Hon. E. F. Ward continues to be the Commanding Officer of R.A.F. Harrowbeer and signed the Station Operation Record Book for the month of July.

 

Visitors to R.A.F. Harrowbeer included :-

                Air Vice Marshal C. Steele DFC  -  Air Officer Commanding No.10 Group

          Captain Warlow  -  Technical Chemical Warfare Advisor to the 3rd Division A. A. Group

          Group Captain Woodall  -  Sector Commander

 

Weather

          1st July     A really wizard day, bags of sun and practice flying undertaken.

          2nd July     Another cracking day.

          3rd July     Almost incredibility, a ninth day in succession - we are currently due for a dose of Harrowbeer fog again.

          4th July     Not a very good day, lots of low cloud about

          5th July     Very mediocre weather, thick cloud and mist.

          6th July     Rained in the morning, clearing about mid-day.

          7th July     Showery in the early morning, clearing up later to a really fine day.

          8th July     Raining periodically throughout the day.

          9th July     Fairly nice weather.

          10th July     The weather clamped down at 0900 hours and did not clear until late in the evening.

          11th July     A completely impossible day, heavy mist and rain clamped right down onto the deck. Visibility is at times down to about thirty yards. Everyone is browned off to tears.

          12th July     A great improvement on yesterday - the sun actually shone about four times.

          13th July     Not a very nice day, bags of low cloud with poor visibility.

          14th July     Another pretty nearly duff day with very little flying being done.

          15th July     Visibility - twenty three and a half gallons. No further comment.

          16th July     A momentary change for the better. Very warm in the morning, clouding over towards the afternoon.

          17th July     A clamp down in the morning, followed by warm sunlight and a wind of gale force proportions. Flying virtually impossible.

          18th July     Semi clamp down all day. Visibility about one mile and no ceiling.

          19th July     Impossible day, heavy rain from 0700 hours onwards continuing until dusk with thick low cloud over the hills and a strong variable wind.

          21st July     Still ropey weather.

          22nd July     A slight improvement in the weather, but still a lot of haze about. Flying duties were cancelled later in the day owing to the weather being u/s.

          24th July     Very poor visibility today.

          25th July     A slight improvement in the weather today. The mist has lifted from the airfield, giving a visibility of around three to four miles.

          26th July     Similar weather to yesterday's. Visibility again three to four miles. Later in the day operations were cancelled owing to the weather turning u/s.

          27th July     A really miserable day. Rain with thick fog and visibility about one hundred yards.

          28th July     A much better day today, although there are still patches of haze which cleared off later however.

          29th July     A poor start to the day, fog again right down to the deck. By mid-day the weather had started to clear and by 1400 hours there were only small patches of cloud with visibility of eight to ten miles. The first really good day for a fortnight.

          30th July     A really good day.

          31st July     The final day of the month opened with favourable weather. At around 1500 hours the weather gradually deteriorated and finally clamped down altogether.

 

From the Station O.R.B.

          4th July     Two Officers and thirty eight Air Training Corps cadets of No.2072 Flight A.T.C.  South Brent visited the Station. Six Air Training Corps cadets from Kelly College, Tavistock visited the Station for instruction on the Link Trainer.          The Squadron Leader for administration proceeded to the Air Ministry to discuss details regarding the supply and operation of a 35mm cinema projector. This projector is to be installed in the gymnasium when the housing nearing completion is ready for its reception.

          8th July     Squadron Leader A. V. Gowers DFC of No.183 Squadron assumed command of the Station, vice Wing Commander the Hon. E. F. Ward proceeded on privilege leave.

          11th July     A gas exercise was carried out during the morning between 0800 hours and 1200 hours. ( see Appendix ' A ' )

          15th July     Information was received from Headquarters No.10 Group that an airwoman at R.A.F. Hope Cove had made serious complaints about the messing at the Grand View Hotel, Hope Cove. An investigation was made into the complaints and a report rendered by the Investigating Officer.

          17th July     Wing Commander the Hon. E. F. Ward resumed command of the Station on his return from leave.

          25th July     The Air Officer Commanding No.10 Group, Air Vice Marshal C. Steele visited the Station.

          26th July     Shooting for the Station Commander's Trophy commenced today. The competition takes place at approximately four monthly intervals and arouses the greatest interest throughout the Station. The Trophy at present is held by the Station Workshop Section.

          28th July     A investigation into an accident owing to a collision between a service pedal bicycle and a motor transport vehicle of No.2738 L.A.A. Squadron, resulting in injuries to Corporal Mathison of No.3100 Echelon was carried out today.     ( see Appendix ' B ' )

          31st July     Five Officers and eighty one other ranks of the Air Training Corps arrived in camp today to undergo a weeks training. They are accommodated in a tented camp, pitched on a suitable open piece of ground on the Communal Site. The cadets are from the following Squadrons :- No.339 Squadron Paignton, No.357 Squadron Wivelscombe, No.1699 Squadron Exeter and No.1322 Squadron Newton Abbott.

          There has been plenty of entertainment on the Station this month of all ranks - R.A.F. and W.A.A.F.

 

Station Sick Quarters  -  Form 540 :-

          The Form 540 for the month of July was signed by Squadron Leader F. Constable, Senior Medical Officer.

          2nd July     Strength of Station and R.A.F. Bolt Head :- R.A.F. = 1643     W.A.A.F. = 431     Army = 216     ATS = 15

          2nd July     Station personnel admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital week ending today :- R.A.F. = 12     W.A.A.F. = 4     Army = 2

          7th July     P1598  Flying Officer Gottowt of No.183 Squadron was killed in an aircraft crash at R.A.F. Harrowbeer  " multiple fatal injuries ".

          9th July     Station personnel admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital week ending today :- R.A.F. = 7     W.A.A.F. = 1     Army = 1

          16th July     Station personnel admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital week ending today :- R.A.F. = 9     W.A.A.F. = 3     Army = 1

          23rd July     Station personnel admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital week ending today :- R.A.F. = 9     W.A.A.F. = 9     Army = 0     ATS = 1

          30th July     Station personnel admitted to the Sick Quarters and Hospital week ending today :- R.A.F. = 5     W.A.A.F. = 2     Army = 1

 

 

Appendix  ' A '

R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer Gas Exercise 

          A gas exercise was held on the 11th July 1943 :- Captain Warlow - Technical  Chemical  Warfare Advisor to the 3rd Division A.A. Group being present.

          The Station was put on alert at 0800 hours and at 0935 hours, the suspected use of gas was reported over the telephone to the Gas Officer by an airman on the Communal Site. In view of the position being adjacent to the Airmen's Mess, the Officer immediately went went down and found a slight concentration of tear gas in the air. The alarm had been given but not picked up beyond the immediate vicinity, and the Catering Officer had taken all precautions for the protection of food both in the Airmen's Mess and the Ration Stores.

          The exercise was considered to be fairly satisfactory and Captain Warlow appeared to be favourably impressed. Owing to the weather it was decided not to use " Burster Bombs " for contaminating vehicles, as had been intended. The Station was announced free of gas by tannoy at 1155 hours and the all clear given at 1215 hours.

          The ' Gas Rattle ' system is not satisfactory and it might be more efficient if a rattle was sounded over the tannoy.

 

Appendix  ' B '

Accident Investigation Report for the night of 22nd / 23rd July 1943

          Report from Squadron Leader F. Constable, Senior Medical Officer at R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer :-

          " I am the Senior Medical Officer at R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer. I was on duty at the Medical Centre on the night of 22nd / 23rd July 1943. At approximately 0020 hours on the 23rd July Major Gaywood brought Corporal Mathison to the Medical Centre and stated that the N.C.O. had been involved in a collision with his car. I examined Corporal Mathison and found that he was slightly shocked and concussed and had a fracture to the outer third clavicle. He also had several minor abrasions of the face and hands. He will probably be non-effective for full duties for three weeks. In my opinion there was no question of Corporal Mathison being under the influence of drink. "

                                               Signed :- F. Constable     Squadron Leader

 

          Summary of Major F. J. Gaywood  LDA,  R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer report :-

          " I am the LDA at R.A.F. Station Harrowbeer. On the night of 22nd / 23rd July 1943 at approximately 0010 hours i was driving an R.A.F. Regiment Hillman van in the direction of my house which is at the Yelverton end of the Aerodrome. Having completed my duty i returned late from Dartmouth and went direct to the Officer's Mess for dinner and later instead of returning the van to the car park at the Aerodrome i drove home intending to return the van next morning. This i admit is not in accordance with instructions that cars are to be returned to the car park on completion of duty. I took the road to Yelverton skirting the south side of the Aerodrome and when i reached a point opposite ' Crossways ' Corporal Mathison who was approaching from the opposite direction collided with the off-side of the van. It was a dark night with thick mist and on account of poor visibility i was proceeding at a crawling pace. The lights of the van i was driving were defective, only the near-side light being in operation. There was no damage to the van, Corporal Mathison  was thrown from his bicycle and sustained slight injury. I immediately conveyed him to the Sick Quarters. "

 

          Damage to the bicycle No.56432 held by Corporal Mathison of No.193 Squadron :-

          An estimate of costs and new parts and labour to above mentioned machine are :-

                                                               £    s    d           Today's price

Cost of labour                                  =      .   10    0                  0.50

Cost of one new front wheel            =       .    5    0                  0.25

Cost of one new front mudguard      =       .    1    3                  0.06

Cost of one new front forks              =       .    7    6                  0.37

                    Total cost                    =       1    3    9               £ 1.18

                              Signed :- J. R. Frost     Flight Sergeant for Transport Office

~    ~    ~    ~    ~    ~

 

P.T.  and  Recreation :-

P.T.  -  The minimum time per person for P.T. is one and a half hours per week as laid down in the recent Commanding Officer's letter. While a few Sections and Squadrons have more than completed this minimum, others have been unable to do so, mainly because of operational duties.

Unarmed Combat  -  The N.C.O.'s promotion course is attended in the Gymnasium, having thirty to forty minutes instruction daily.

Swimming  -  Dinghy drill, swimming instruction and recreational swimming was carried out in the fine weather at the open air swimming pool at the ' Moorland Links Hotel ' where the Station have obtained a reduction in administration charge.

Squash  -  The court for Officers and Flying personnel was used very infrequently during the month due to a limited number of balls available.

Tennis  -  The use of courts at private houses have been granted and a number of personnel have made use of this facility. There is a reluctance on the part of potential players to bring their own rackets onto the Station and the Gymnasium Store have non for loan, otherwise greater numbers would play.          A match ( men's doubles ) has been arranged between the Station and R.A.F. Mount Batten for the 31st July.

Cricket  -   The improvement in June has continued this month. The Station can now raise two very competent teams - a useful asset when players are likely to be called away at the last minute for operational duties.          Five matches were played in July ( four home and one away ). All five matches were won by the Station. The best score was one hundred and fifty six for six.          Two more matches are to be played against R.A.F. Mount Batten and Fort Eginton ( Plymouth ).

               Seven a side cricket competitions have been very popular between inter-sections. Matches are limited to twelve overs per innings, an average score is found by each team dividing its runs by the number of wickets lost. If all wickets fall before the end of twelve overs the side continues batting in the same order. The highest average wins. Unfortunately the smooth running fixtures have been impeded by bad weather.

Badminton  -  The court in the Gymnasium is regularly and frequently used by both Officers and airmen.

Boxing  -  Two Station personnel - one from No.270 A.S.R. Squadron and one from the R.A.F. Regiment are at present training for a fight in Plymouth on August 7th.

 

Entertainment :-  

The usual entertainments have been held on the Station during the month.          ENSA have provided two cinema shows and three ' live ' entertainments.             The Station Cinema has provided four entertainments during the month with good audiences.          It would be much appreciated if more up to date films could be obtained for the services.          The fortnightly dance and a special Squadron dance complete the entertainments for the month.

 

From the Squadron O.R.B.'s

 

No.183 Squadron :- 

          2nd July     The Commanding Officer returned from his Combined Operations Course and in the evening led an armed shipping reconnaissance operation. The formation of Typhoon aircraft flew at sea level to Brehat and along the French Coast to Sept Isles. There was a thick haze off the coast rising to about three to four hundred feet. No shipping was sighted. There was no opposition in the air or on the ground encountered and all aircraft returned safely.

          4th July     Quite a busy day today. During the morning the pilots went up on formation flights, air to sea firing practice, etc.          At 1920 hours four Typhoon aircraft were airborne for an armed shipping reconnaissance with six aircraft of No.266 Squadron as escort. They made a perfect rendezvous at Start Point and flew at sea level to Brehat and thence westwards to Iles De Batz. Again no shipping was sighted and no opposition from the ground or air. The weather was good over the sea with visibility eight to ten miles. The aircraft landed safely back at base at 2045 hours.

          6thJuly     There was a shipping reconnaissance operation  detailed for the morning but owing to the weather conditions the aircraft returned after being airborne for thirty five minutes.          In the evening twelve Typhoon aircraft took off on another armed shipping reconnaissance, four of the aircraft carrying bombs. They flew at sea level for about fifteen miles east of Brehat, then turned west to Sept Isles. Though the weather was clear nothing was sighted and all aircraft returned safely back to base.

          7th July     A shipping reconnaissance laid on in the afternoon. Four No.183 Squadron Typhoon aircraft were loaded with bombs and six Typhoon aircraft as escort flew to the Sept Isles, then westwards to Landeda. They saw nothing and returned to base.          It is with regret that we record the death of Flying Officer Gottowt - the only Pole in the Squadron. He met his death in a flying accident during the evening. He was a keen pilot and fighter, popular with all of us, and he will be sadly missed by the Squadron. He always flew as the Commanding Officer's No.2.     Porucznik ( Flying Officer ) Eugeniusz Gottowt is laid to rest in the Service Section H - Grave 362 of the Northwood Cemetery.

          8th July     Ten Typhoon aircraft of No.183 Squadron left soon after first light for R.A.F. Predannack. From there they were to bomb Guipavas Aerodrome with No.193 Squadron and No.266 Squadron as escorts.

          11th July     It was the most depressing day since our arrival here, continuous drizzle and heavy mist with visibility about thirty yards. The day was spent in the Mess, sleeping and playing snooker.

          13th July     At 1555 hour a reconnaissance flight took place - four Typhoon aircraft of No.183 Squadron were armed up with two five hundred and fifty pound, general purpose, three second fuse bombs each. Four other Typhoon aircraft of No.183 Squadron were to act as escort along with four Typhoons of No.193 Squadron. Two of the bombers returned to base landing at 1640 hours, one having oil pressure trouble. The other aircraft flew to the west of Vierge, turned east and at about five miles north west of Batz saw a small ship taken to be a tug estimated at two hundred tons. The lead aircraft of No.193 Squadron fired his cannon as he flew over, two fighters of No.183 Squadron attacked with cannon fire from south to north and then the Typhoon bombers came in. The first aircraft dropped two bombs which were either direct hits or very near misses. The second aircraft attacking from the sea scored one near miss, the second bomb overshooting. As they turned away from the target the ship was seen to be listing slightly, belching smoke and steam and had stopped moving. Shortly after the attack one Typhoon aircraft of No.183 Squadron was attacked by two FW190's which approached from out of the sun, one of them getting in a burst. The pilot was uninjured, but hits were scored on the cowling, tail, fuselage and wings rendering his hydraulic system, radio and A.S.I. u/s. He landed without flaps or brakes and overshot the runway. His aircraft was category B. The tug was claimed to be category III.

          14th July     The Squadron had a liberty run to the Lopes Hotel, Roborough and drank freely of an excellent draught Bass, they then took a stock back to the Mess, where the party continued in high spirits until 0200 hours. A most enjoyable ' thrash '.

          20th July     There was a shipping reconnaissance operation in the morning, ten Typhoon aircraft took part, four of them with bombs. When within ten miles off the French Coast the operation was abandoned due to bad weather conditions.

          25th July     In the evening there was a shipping reconnaissance duty consisting of four Typhoon bomber aircraft, four Typhoon escort aircraft and three Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron. Unfortunately the operation was cancelled in mid-channel owing to the thick haze down to sea level.

          29th July    The weather just lately has not been very good for practice flying or operationally. Several operations have had to be abandoned so time for the pilots has had to be spent on aircraft recognition, tests and lectures.

          30th July     The afternoon was spent on Dinghy drill at the Moorland Links Hotel.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of July was signed by :- Squadron Leader Gowers and Pilot Officer S. I. Williams ( Intelligence Officer ).

 

No.193 Squadron :-

          1st July     An auspicious start to the new month with a really wizard day. No synthetics today due to the Link Trainer being u/s.

          2nd July     Only one armed shipping reconnaissance operation and escort to No.183 Squadron was carried out in the evening.

          3rd July     The ninth nice day in succession. Training flying went on to the utmost limit of our serviceability which although low, is still a bit of a tribute to the hard work of the pertinacity of the senior N.C.O.'s and troops.

          4th July     Very poor serviceability so not so much flying could take place. The Link Trainer is still u/s.

          5th July     One operational patrol today and lots of training flying undertaken.          A normal patrol saw four destroyers with balloons five miles south west of Start Point, twenty to twenty five small fishing vessels without balloons south east of Brixham and three large fishing vessels with balloons south of Exmouth.

          7th July     Squadron Leader J. W. Petre attached to the Fighter Leader Course.          The Link Trainer can-not be used due to it's present state of disrepair.

          8th July     Four Typhoon aircraft left for R.A.F. Predannack early in the morning.          Low serviceability prevented any practice flying.          The Link Trainer is now serviceable again, and the usual distasteful synthetics took place in the afternoon.

          9th July     Four Typhoon aircraft took off for R.A.F. Predannack at 0600 hours and had one abortive attempt on a shipping reconnaissance.          Throughout the day No.193 Squadron also carried out escort duties to No.183 Squadron.

          10th July     The weather was bad today, not clearing until late into the evening.          The Squadron had to content themselves with synthetics ( the Link Trainer ) and revolver shooting practice.          Two Typhoon aircraft were scrambled at 0625 hours onto a vector of one hundred and eighty degrees and told there were three bandits thirty miles south of Exmouth at eight thousand feet going west. When the aircraft reached the interception point, the bandits were reported at two thousand feet. The section searched below 10/10 cloud but could find neither bandits nor ' friends on the sea ' which were supposed to be there. The section was next ordered to return to base. The ' friends on the sea ' were later plotted forty miles from D.R. position. The aircraft landed back at base at 0715 hours.

          13th July     Four Typhoon aircraft led by Flight Lieutenant P. H. Beake escorted four Bomphoons (  Typhoon aircraft armed with bombs ) and Typhoon aircraft of No.183 Squadron on an operation. They flew at sea level to five miles west of Vierge and turned about four miles offshore. They saw an enemy ship of about two hundred tons approximately one mile to the west of Batz. Flight Lieutenant Beake led an attack and scored hits with cannon fire. The Bombphoons then followed, the first bomb fell short but the other three bombs scored hits or very near misses. On leaving, the target was seen giving off smoke and steam and listing slightly in a stationary position. Cine-camera film confirms severe damage.

          17th July     The weather is still not being kind to the Squadron. Flying is virtually impossible, so it's still more synthetic training.

          19th July     An impossible flying day with heavy rain from 0700 hours continuing until dusk. The Squadron was on basic state from 0530 hours onwards.          The only flying that could be done was a weather reconnaissance.          No advantages could be taken on the Link Trainer as the Station Instructor was posted today.

          20th July     Three sections carried out a practice low level rendezvous in the form of a shipping reconnaissance.          Weather testing and gun-camera attacks above five thousand feet were also included in today's flying programme.

          25th July     The weather has improved slightly today with visibility about three to four miles.          There were bags of practice sorties carried out throughout the day and in the evening an armed shipping reconnaissance took place taking off at 2044 hours, but had to be abandoned in mid-channel owing to thick fog being right down to sea level.

          28th July     A reasonable day although there are still patches of haze about. This cleared up later.          Flying consisted of practice interceptions, combats, formation flying and low level flying.          At 2025 hours Green Section while on stand-by duties was scrambled to the Exeter area to intercept bandits at three thousand feet. After several vectors without leading to interceptions the Squadron was ordered to pancake.

          29thJuly     This was the first good day for nearly a fortnight, although the weather was poor early on in the day.

          30th July     Six Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron left for R.A.F. Predannack at 1330 hours to be on readiness there at 1400 hours.          They were called on to form escorts on a ' Circus ' which had to be abandoned and a shipping reconnaissance which was also rendered abortive owing to the weather being u/s over the French Coast and Channel areas. All aircraft landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer by 2120 hours.

          31st July     The final day of the month opened with favourable weather, and as much flying practice as possible was carried out until about 1500 hours. The weather then gradually deteriorated.          Two sections were ordered off to escort No.183 Squadron on an armed shipping reconnaissance, Start Point - Batz - Il Vierge and back to base. The aircraft were up at 1900 hours and returned to base after twenty five minutes. After reaching Bolt Head the weather was u/s and once again the operation had to be abandoned.

               The closing of this month without an accident brings the Squadron record to five successive months without an accident.

The Squadron O.R.B for the month of July was signed by :-  Flight Lieutenant P. Beake.

 

No.276 Air Sea Rescue Squadron     ' B ' Flight :-

          1st July     Air Vice Marshal Steele  DFC  -  Air Officer Commanding No.10 Group and Captain Woodall  -  Sector Commander visited the Squadron Headquarters today and had talks with the aircrew of ' B ' Flight.

          2nd July     Two Spitfire aircraft were ordered off at 0520 hours to search for a bomber aircraft thought to be a Wellington in the sea. Faint plots were obtained during the night. The search position was twenty eight miles out and one hundred and fifty degrees from Start Point. A strip search was carried out but nothing sighted. The Spitfires landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 0710 hours.

          4th July     In the evening two Spitfire aircraft were ordered off to carry out a patrol twenty miles south of Start Point, pending the return of Typhoon bombers out on an armed shipping reconnaissance. This patrol was uneventful.

          6th July     Two Spitfire aircraft patrolled ten miles south of Bolt Head to await the return of Typhoon bombers on a shipping reconnaissance, but the patrol was uneventful.

          7th July     Practice dinghy drill was carried out by ' B ' Flight aircrew at the Moorland Links Hotel swimming pool today.          One of the pilots carried out tests with a locally modified dinghy in a Spitfire aircraft today. These tests were very successful and photographs were obtained of the actual drop.          All the air-gunners were re-graded today ( much to their joy ) and received an ante-date of approximately twelve months.

          8th July     Aircraft of No.276 A.S.R. Squadron and some of the aircrew flew to ' A ' Flight ( R.A.F. Warmwell ) where a Ministry of Information publicity film was being made. All personnel and aircraft returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer on the same day.

          9th July     A No.276 A.S.R. Squadron dance was held tonight in the Station Gymnasium, complete with beer garden and cabaret. This proved to be an excellent ' do '.          No.276 A.S.R. Squadron ' A ' Flight took advantage of the u/s weather and had discussions with the Station Education Officer, the subject being " Women after the war ".

          17th July      An Anson aircraft was flown to R.A.F. Northolt to collect dinghies for the Spitfires.

          18th July     Flight Lieutenant F. O. Dimblebee of ' C ' Flight ( R.A.F. Portreath Flight Commander ) was today awarded the DFC for his work in saving numerous lives, whilst in No.276 A.S.R.  Squadron.

          22nd July     Circuits and landings carried out by ' B ' Flight in a Walrus aircraft and dual instruction given to new pilots.

          24th July     Unofficial intimation was today received that Sergeant V. Dorman who was reported missing after operations on the 7th June 1943 was now a prisoner of war in Germany.

          25th July     At 2100 hours ' B ' Flight was ordered to patrol south of Bolt Head while Typhoon bomber aircraft carried out an armed shipping reconnaissance, the patrol was uneventful.

          27th July     ' B ' Flight was ordered to search near Sept Isles for a Mustang aircraft pilot who had ditched the previous evening, but weather conditions prohibited any searching.

          31st July     Operationally this has been a very slack month as far as this Squadron is concerned. most of the flying being only practice.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of July was signed by :- Squadron Leader R.F. Hamlyn.

 

No.279  Air Sea Rescue Squadron :- 

          5th July     A Hudson aircraft was ordered off at 9535 hours to carry out a creeping line ahead search for rafts reported in the sea. The rafts were sighted at 0745 hours carrying one body believed to be dead in position STAK5916 ( 49 degrees 57 mins N. 08 degrees 25 mins W ). An M.T.B. ( Motor Torpedo Boat ) was called to the area. The Hudson landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1114 hours.          Another Hudson aircraft was airborne at 1019 hours to search for a raft, they sighted a Walrus aircraft and continued to search until 1158hours when a smoke float was sighted. Two H.S.L.'s ( High Speed Launch ) came alongside the raft and were last seen at 1355 hours attempting to tow the raft. The raft was in position 49 degrees 52 mins N. 07 degrees 42 mins W. The Hudson landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1510 hours.

          7th July     An aircraft was airborne at 0923 hours for a creeping line ahead search. Results - nil. The aircraft returned to base at 1441 hours.

          13th July     Another morning search with nil results.

          18th July     An airborne search was carried out between 1235 hours and 1658 hours by a Hudson aircraft with an airborne lifeboat. The results for the search was again - nil.

          24th July     A Hudson aircraft was airborne at 1355 hours for an air sea rescue search to Bardsey Island. Result  -  nil. Nothing of importance was seen on the outward and return journey. The Hudson landed at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1614 hours.

          28th July     Two Hudson aircraft at 1045 hours were airborne on an air sea rescue search. A French fishing vessel was sighted. At 1342 hours the search was abandoned owing to the lack of cloud cover. After setting course for the Lizard, Cornwall an empty lifeboat was sighted at 1343 hours waterlogged and containing no sign of life. Both aircraft landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1452 hours.

          30th July     A Hudson aircraft took off at 0855 hours and flew to R.A.F. Predannack where it picked up four Mustang aircraft to escort it on it's search. Results  -  nil. The Hudson landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1715 hours.          Another Hudson aircraft was airborne at 1849 hours to fly to R.A.F. Predannack and pick up an escort of two Mustang aircraft and then to carry out a search. Results  -  nil. The Hudson landed at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 2230 hours.

          31stJuly     A Hudson aircraft was ordered off at 1140 hours to carry out an air sea rescue search, but nothing was sighted in the search area. The Hudson landed at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1335 hours.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of July was signed by :- Wing Commander B. G. Corry  DFC.

 

No.286 ( Army Air Co-operation ) Squadron :-

          There was a detachment of No.286 ( A.A.C. ) Squadron still at R.A.F. Harrowbeer during the month of July, although there is nothing documented in the Squadron O.R.B. of their ' Summary of Events ' ( Form 540 ) or the ' Detail of Work Carried Out ' ( Form 541 ) documents.

 

 

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June  1943 

Wing Commander the Hon. E. F. Ward continues to be the Commanding Officer of R.A.F. Harrowbeer.          The Station Operation Record Book for the month of June was signed by Squadron Leader Chris Hogg, the Station Administration Officer.

 

Visitors to R.A.F. Harrowbeer included :-

          Air Chief Marshal Sir Philip Joubert -

          A.O.C.  Air Vice Marshal Steele - Air Officer Commanding No.10 Group

          ?   ?   ?     -  Group Captain in charge of R.A.F. Exeter

          Squadron Leader Lloyd-Jones - No.19 Group Air Sea Rescue Liaison Officer

          Squadron Leader Mossford - Officer Commanding No.279 Air Sea Rescue Squadron

          Flight Lieutenant Pushman - No.10 Group Air Sea Rescue Squadron Liaison Officer

          Major Morgan - No.10 Group G2

          Group Captain Barraclough - Senior Administrative Officer No.10 Group

 

Weather 

          1st June     A filthy day. The weather was u/s until about 1430 hours. There was a brighter spell for a while before it clamped down entirely for the rest of the day with heavy rain. There was also strong South Westerly winds of around twenty to thirty miles per hour.

          2nd June     Today early on there was heavy rain, 10/10 cloud and a very thick haze. There was a strong North West wind with a lot of low cloud, causing restricted flying. The bad weather continued until 1400 hours before clearing up with visibility of about five to eight miles.

          3rd June     Another miserable morning with a lot of low cloud, heavy showers of rain and considerable haze. Visibility at first was about half a mile clearing to around three miles during the forenoon. At about 1400 hours the weather cleared up slightly. Towards the end of the day the weather went duff again.

          4th June     The weather was fair early on with visibility of five to ten miles. The weather deteriorated rapidly and became impossible from 1230 hours onwards.

          5th June     The morning opened with fairly dull weather and a haze which gradually cleared away by mid-day. The weather cleared up a little in the early afternoon with visibility of around five to six miles.

          6th June     The morning opened with fair weather, some low cloud and patches of mist. The weather clamped down from 1500 hours until 1700 hours before clearing up once more.

          7th June     Early on the weather was fairly bright, but large patches of mist was hanging around the Aerodrome. By 1030 hours the weather had gradually deteriorated and by 1300 hours became totally u/s.

          8th June     A filthy day again. Heavy rain and thick mist right down to the deck.

          9th June     Another nasty start to the day, bags of rain and a thick haze. A thick mist covers the hill tops most mornings making flying impossible. About noon however the weather began to clear and by 1400 hours it was quite bright and apart from considerable patches of low cloud, proved to be good for flying.

          10th June     What a lousy morning, thick mist right down on the deck once more. The weather cleared up a little in the afternoon.

          11th June     Quite a good day for a change.

          12th June     The weather again fairly good with visibility about twenty miles.

          13th June     Quite a good morning, but a lot of broken cloud about.

          14th June     The weather was quite good early on in the day, but there were heavy showers of rain later on throughout the day.

          15th June    Adverse weather conditions. The weather was moderate early on, deteriorating by 0600 hours. The weather then clamped down for a spell turning to heavy rain and thick low cloud until about 1530 hours, after that brighter spells appeared.

          16th June     Quite a favourable morning, although there were patches of thick cloud about.

          17th June     Early on the weather was not too bad, but as the morning progressed it clamped down for a short spell, clearing up again before 1200 hours.

          18th June     An impossible morning. Rain and thick mist right down on the deck, this continued all day. A no flying day on the Aerodrome.

          19th June     Another filthy day, much the same as yesterday.

          20th June     The morning weather again continued to be poor with cloud and haze until around 1500 hours when it cleared up and flying practice restarted.

          21st June     A really nice day. The first in two or three weeks.

          22nd June     Quite a reasonable day today, with unfortunate haze up on the moors.

          23rd June     A reasonable day with lots of operational flying taking place.

          24th June     At last, a really good day with a generous amount of flying undertaken.

          25th June     The weather reverts to the usual R.A.F. Harrowbeer clamp, 11/10 cloud at zero feet.

          26th June     A really nice day again.

          27th June     A wizard day.

          28th June     This is too good to last, yet another really wizard day.

          29th June     Perfect weather, although somewhat hot for carrying out stand-by duties

          30th June     Another reasonable day.

 

From the Station O.R.B.

      

          3rd June     Six Mustang aircraft of No.414 Squadron R.C.A.F. moved to R.A.F. Predannack to operate on an ' instep ' operation. The operation was uneventful.          Three sections of No.310 ( Czech ) Squadron moved to R.A.F. Harrowbeer to act as level escort to aircraft on an operation.

          5th June     No.414 Squadron R.C.A.F. moved to R.A.F. Portreath.          No.183 Squadron arrived on the Station from R.A.F. Colerne.

          7th June     A Walrus aircraft of No.276 Air Sea Rescue Squadron escorted by a Spitfire aircraft took off from R.A.F. Bolt Head to search for a pilot of No.412 Squadron R.C.A.F. The pilot was successfully rescued. While this rescue was taking place two more Spitfire aircraft from No.276 Air Sea Rescue Squadron were airborne to locate the dinghy in the Sept Isles area. The empty dinghy was located and the pilot of No.1 aircraft sunk it with gunfire, unfortunately pilot No.2 ( Sergeant V. Dorman ) was not responding to R/T messages and failed to return to R.A.F. Harrowbeer. Sergeant V. Dorman is reported as missing.

          9th June     During the afternoon No.78 Signals Wing Calibration Flight left R.A.F. Harrowbeer for R.A.F. Davidstowe.          A detachment of No.279 Air Sea Rescue Squadron ( Hudson aircraft ) arrived at R.A.F. Harrowbeer from R.A.F. Davidstow Moor.

          11th June     It was learnt from a reliable source that Sergeant V. Dorman had been attacked by six FW190's.

          13th June     At approximately 0020 hours a sharp attack took place on Plymouth causing damage and casualties.

          15th June     At dawn and during the morning Typhoon aircraft of No.183 and No.193 Squadrons took off on armed shipping reconnaissance duties, each time they were recalled owing to adverse weather conditions. Finally at approximately 1700 hours they were able to complete the operation which turned out to be uneventful.          Two Spitfire aircraft of No.276 Air Sea Rescue Squadron and three Hudson aircraft of No.279 Air Sea Rescue Squadron carried out A.S.R. sorties.          During the evening two Spitfire aircraft and one Walrus aircraft of No.276 A.S.R. Squadron were detailed off on a rescue sortie. The Walrus found a pilot floating in the sea in his ' Mae West ' in a large patch of oil. A dinghy and a smoke float were dropped but before the pilot could get into the dinghy the Walrus had landed on the sea and after three attempts the pilot was picked up. The Walrus was unable to take off owing to the rough sea but a rescue launch arrived on the scene and the pilot was transferred to it. The Walrus then started to taxi towards the coast and was met by another launch which guided it into Salcombe.

          24th June     Air Chief Marshal Sir Philip Joubert visited the Station.          Four Typhoon aircraft of No.183 Squadron and eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron took off on No.10 Group ' Circus ' number 38 setting course from R.A.F. Bolt Head to land-fall at Isle de Batz at ten thousand feet and then climbing to twelve thousand feet. The Typhoon bomber aircraft then turned towards the target from the West and dived in column from twelve thousand feet to three thousand feet releasing their bombs at four thousand feet. The leading Typhoon bomber owing to difficulty in releasing it's bombs overshot his objective and as a result the other bombers overshot the mark. Two of the Typhoon bombers only released one bomb a piece. Bomb bursts were seen on the extreme edge of the South East dispersal area. No enemy aircraft were seen on the ground or in the air. On the return journey the formation sighted a sailing boat heading North and waving a flag which appeared to be red, white and blue. Two launches were sent to the scene where the occupants, believed to be Frenchmen were taken on board.          A pilot of No.286 Squadron crashed while low flying during an Army Co-operation flight near St. Germans and was killed.

          25th June     The Air Officer Commanding No.10 Group - Air Vice Marshal Steele accompanied by a Group Captain in charge of R.A.F. Exeter Sector visited the Station.          Two Hudson aircraft of No.279 Air Sea Rescue Squadron while on an A.S.R. sortie sighted a landing barge awash but with no survivors on board so they sank it by gunfire. A raft was seen in the vicinity but again there were no survivors.

          26th June     Four Typhoon bomber aircraft of No.183 Squadron and eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron moved early in the morning to R.A.F. Predannack to operate in No.10 Group ' Circus ' number 39.

          27th June     While on patrol off Bolt Head a Spitfire aircraft of No.610 Squadron hit the sea with a wing-tip and went straight in, the pilot being killed.

          28th June     Seven Typhoon aircraft of No.266 Squadron arrived at approximately 1635 hours. At 1830 hours six Typhoon aircraft of No.266 Squadron took off to escort Typhoon bomber aircraft of No.183 Squadron for an attack on Morlaix Aerodrome.          At approximately 0725 hours one aircraft from a formation of twelve Flying Fortresses which passed over R.A.F. Harrowbeer landed to re-fuel. The crew reported to No.276 A.S.R. Squadron that two Flying Fortresses had gone into the sea and gave their approximate positions. A Walrus aircraft and two Spitfire aircraft took off to search for both crews, one of the latter found a Walrus aircraft from R.A.F. Portreath orbiting two large dinghies containing the crews who were picked up by a rescue launch.

 

From the Squadron O.R.B.'s

 

No.78 Signals Wing Calibration Flight :-

          9th June     No.78 Signals Wing Calibration Flight left R.A.F. Harrowbeer for R.A.F. Station Davidstowe.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of June was unsigned.

 

No.183 Squadron :-

          3rd June     Information has been received that the Squadron is to move from R.A.F. Colerne to R.A.F. Harrowbeer.

          5th June     Four Typhoon aircraft flew to R.A.F. Harrowbeer. The main party went by rail leaving at 1300 hours. A dreary journey which ended at 2100 hours.

          6th June     No flying today, but a busy day never the less. Settling in to our new quarters. In the evening there was a party in the Mess.

          9th June     The weather is not at all what we expected, in Devon, in June - a thick mist covers the hill tops and makes flying impossible in the mornings.

          12th June     The Squadron was detailed to take part in an operation with No.193 Squadron. After the escort was airborne the Squadron Leader's oxygen was found to be unserviceable and although this was rectified the operation was cancelled owing to the delay. Bad luck, but we hope to get cracking soon.

          15th June     A day of some disappointments. At 0530 hours four Typhoon aircraft were bombed up ready and escorted by eight Typhoon aircraft from No.193 Squadron, they were airborne on a armed shipping reconnaissance, but had to return owing to unsuitable weather.          Again at 0935 hours the formation was recalled, owing to the state of the tide.          At 1700 hours they were again airborne, the weather was good, but no target presented itself and the bombs were brought back to base.

          16th June     Another armed shipping reconnaissance was carried out by four Typhoon aircraft, escorted by eight Typhoon aircraft of No.266 Squadron. Unfortunately nothing was seen and the bombs were jettisoned safely into the sea.

          19th June     Two pilots were airborne on a ' rhubarb ' and made landfall a little further West than planned. They turned Westward to avoid the Brest barrage balloons and sighted two merchant ships in the Goulet de Brest. They attacked them from one hundred and fifty degrees and at mast height scoring two near misses. One bomb actually appeared to hit one of the ships. The Squadron claim two ships category four. One of the bombs failed to release and the pilot brought it back - very annoyed he was too.

          26th June     Four Typhoon aircraft of No.183 Squadron were sent off to bomb Brest - Guipavas Aerodrome escorted by seven Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron. They were airborne from R.A.F. Predannack at 0904 hours. It was a successful operation in which a few FW190 enemy aircraft presumed to interfere. All the bombers got back safely, and although one of the fighters was hit, he got home without much trouble.

          28th June     An attack on Morlaix Aerodrome was carried out today. Four Typhoon bomber aircraft were escorted by six Typhoon aircraft of No.266 Squadron and ten Spitfire aircraft of No.610 Squadron as target support. Bomb bursts were seen on the Eastern end of the Aerodrome, but appeared to drop short of the dispersals. All the aircraft returned safely.

          30th June     The Squadron were up at first light for an armed shipping reconnaissance with eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron in the area of Isle de Batz - Sept Isles. Nothing was seen, and bombs were jettisoned five miles from the English Coast.          There was a similar sortie in the evening, this time from the Isle de Brehat and North East between Jersey and Sark. Nothing was seen and all aircraft returned safely.

               The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of June was signed by :- Flight Lieutenant A. S. Dredge and Pilot Officer S. I. Williams ( Intelligence Officer ).

 

No.193 Squadron :-

          1st June     The first patrol for No.193 Squadron today was up at 0635 hours and landing at 0745 hours. The weather then became u/s until approximately 1430 hours.

          2nd June     The weather was not too good today so a lot of synthetics and intelligence gen kept the troops busy during the early part of the day. At 1625 hours an anti-rhubarb patrol was carried out.

          3rd June     One section of the Squadron was at stand by and two sections at readiness, although the weather was terrible with visibility at times only half a mile, clearing to three miles. Some practice flying and a patrol was carried out when the weather cleared sufficiently. The patrol saw a convoy off Bolt Head and eight Motor Torpedo Boats off Dartmouth, the trip was uneventful.          The serviceability of the Squadron aircraft was very poor again.

          4th June     The first patrol of the day took off at 0700 hours but had to land at R.A.F. Exeter as the weather at R.A.F. Harrowbeer became u/s. The weather continued to deteriorate throughout the day.

          5th June     Several anti-rhubarb patrols, practice flights and a scramble were carried out today.

          6th June     An early patrol was carried out, but loss of serviceability of aircraft is holding up training.          Two Typhoon aircraft were detailed off at 1312 hours on an anti-rhubarb patrol which was normal until 1350 hours. When the section were off Dartmouth, they were warned of a bogey twenty miles to the South going South West. The section were given a vector of two hundred and forty degrees at angels one, then two hundred and sixty degrees at angels two and then zero ten degrees at angels two. They observed aircraft flying off Torquay North East which proved to be friendly. The section were then ordered to resume normal patrol. The two Typhoon aircraft then saw four small vessels with balloons off Dartmouth, the aircraft landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1435 hours.          The weather clamped down from 1500 hours until 1700 hours.          A section of two Typhoon aircraft took off at 1805 hours on an anti-rhubarb patrol, they saw miscellaneous shipping off Dartmouth and passed a Squadron of Spitfire aircraft flying North East. The section landed at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1920 hours. No.1 of the section reported that Control was using a strange phonetic alphabet!

          7th June     More synthetics for the troops today due to the poor weather conditions.          Red section of No.193 Squadron comprising of two Typhoon aircraft carried out a convoy patrol, they were up at 1843 hours, but they had to pancake at R.A.F. Exeter as the weather was u/s at R.A.F. Harrowbeer.          Another four Typhoon aircraft went out to take over the patrol from the previous section, taking off from R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 2002 hours. They also had to pancake at R.A.F. Exeter at 2059 hours without seeing the convoy. Having been vectored South of Plymouth, the convoy with Red section had actually taken a South Easterly course from Plymouth.          Control were using a strange phonetic alphabet tonight!

          8th June     The weather was very bad today with heavy rain and thick mist right down on the deck.          Half of the pilots took their aircraft recognition test today and set up a record for R.A.F. Harrowbeer tests so far, every pilot had one hundred per cent pass.          Flight Lieutenant P. Beake goes to R.A.F. Charmy Down to take a ' Fighter Leaders Course '.

          9th June     Another bad day - to start with bags of rain and a thick haze. Fortunately the weather cleared about noon and by 1400 hours the day proved quite good for flying.

          10th June     A lousy morning with thick mist right down on the deck again.         One section of the Squadron was at readiness and two sections at available during the morning.          Flying Officer R. Hulbert returns from the ' Fighter Leaders Course ' at R.A.F. Charmy Down, looking fit and was soon being heartily congratulated by the troops.          The serviceability of the aircraft is still very poor.          Several pilots of No.139 Squadron left today to go on a Destroyer and take part in convoy duties operating from Plymouth.

          12th June     The Squadron Commanding Officer arrived back from a " spot of leave " plus the " Napier Engine Course ".          The Squadron had eight Typhoon aircraft airborne to escort for Typhoon bomber aircraft of No.183 Squadron on a ' Circus ' operation. After No.193 Squadron had taken off ' No.183 Squadron Leaders ' aircraft went u/s. The defective oxygen supply, which was the cause of the trouble was rectified and the Typhoon bombers took off. There had however been too much of a delay and the operation was cancelled. All aircraft were ordered to return to base.

          13th June     A Flying Officer went out in a Tiger Moth and spotted a parachute hanging from a tree near Plym-bridge. This was reported to the police at Yelverton.

          14th June     The Yelverton police had an unsuccessful search for the parachute. The said Flying Officer got airborne in the Tiger Moth once more and guided the police to the exact spot where it was hanging. It turned out to be a flare parachute.          An early patrol and practice flying was carried out by the Squadron.

          15th June     More patrols carried out with No.183 Squadron, which turned out to be uneventful.          There was quite a clean out of the Squadron personnel with nine postings to other Squadrons taking place.

          16th June     Serviceability of the Squadron's aircraft is still very bad resulting in very little flying being carried out.          The pilots whose postings came through yesterday, cleared the Station today.

          17th June     The airmen who had not had the aircraft recognition test on the 8th June were put through the mill today.           Bad serviceability is again keeping the flying hours down.

          18th June     Rain and thick mist right down on the deck which continued all day.          Several of the pilots visited Plymouth Docks to inspect the various ships with special interest in the Motor Torpedo Boats, sadly there were no M.T.B.'s in dock today. In fact the arrangements to receive and escort the troops around were very disappointing. After two hours tramping around the dockyard without being allowed to go on board any of the ships the pilots withdrew to Plymouth and spent the rest of the evening in lighter vein.

          20th June     Two Typhoon aircraft were ordered off at 1510 hours on an anti-rhubarb patrol. They were vectored onto a " bandit " at twelve thousand feet, ten miles South of Bolt Head. The " bandit " turned before interception could be made. Both Typhoon aircraft returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer, landing at 1605 hours.

          21st June     Due to the untiring efforts of the ground crew the Squadron managed to muster eleven serviceable aircraft which enabled bags of flying by the non-operational pilots.          Two Typhoon aircraft were scrambled at 1315 hours and vectored onto a " bandit " fifteen miles South of Portland Bill going West. The section were unsuccessful as nothing was sighted. The Typhoon aircraft returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer landing at 1415 hours.          Another two Typhoon aircraft were ordered off at 1900 hours and carried out a normal patrol until vectored onto a " bandit " due West and chased it by vectors to within fifteen miles of Guernsey. The two Typhoons landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 2010 hours.

          22nd June     One Typhoon aircraft was sent off on a patrol at 0605 hours and spotted thirty small fishing vessels ten to fifteen miles South of Brixham. The patrol ended at 0720 hours with the Typhoon landing back at base.          Two Typhoon aircraft were scrambled at 1350 hours and ordered to patrol ten miles South of Start Point. After ten minutes the aircraft resumed a normal patrol. They saw a small convoy South of Barry Head and numerous fishing vessels off Brixham. The two Typhoons landed back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1505 hours.

          23rd June     Due to low serviceability it was again synthetics whenever possible.          Three scrambles were carried out throughout the day by No.193 Squadron, two of which involved chasing " bandits " in the Exmouth and Bolt Head areas.

          24th June     Eight Typhoon aircraft from R.A.F. Harrowbeer took off at 1640 hours to act as close escort and high cover to four Typhoon bomber aircraft of No.183 Squadron to bomb Morlaix Aerodrome. The Typhoon bombers bombed the target from twelve thousand feet down to four thousand feet. The No.193 Squadron Typhoons followed the bombers down in their dive. No aircraft were seen on the ground or in the air. The formation returned at sea level sighting one small sailing boat at about 1750 hours. The boat was orbited and fixes given of it's position. It was noticed that the boat contained two men, one of which appeared to be waving a tricoleur. The Typhoon aircraft returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1810 hours. The men in the boat were later picked up.

          25th June     Back to the usual R.A.F. Harrowbeer clamp, 11/10 cloud at zero feet.

          26th June     Eight Typhoon aircraft of No.193 Squadron left for R.A.F. Predannack early in the morning to escort No.183 Squadron aircraft on an operation. Only seven Typhoon aircraft were airborne at 0930 hours and set course with the No.183 Squadron Bombphoon aircraft over the Lizard, Cornwall at 0906 hours at zero feet. The formation then climbed to two thousand feet on approaching the French Coast. The formation approached it's target ( Guipavas Aerodrome ) four miles North East of Brest from the East. The No.183 Squadron Bombphoons dropped their bombs and turned out to the Coast, observing a large patch of heavy flak behind them. After leaving the Coast, Blue section was attacked by three FW190's when down at zero feet. Blue No.3 had his starboard main tank punctured by an explosive cannon shell. The attack was broken off when Red No.1 circled and came round behind Blue section. Red No.1 became separated from the main formation and managed to evade the three FW190's by making skidding turns at very high speeds. After crossing two thirds of the Channel Red No.1 was again attacked and escaped by similar tactics. The formation returned and pancaked at R.A.F. Portreath at 1005 hours.

          27th June     Flying training was suspended today in favour of an ' air escape exercise ' in which he Home Guard were well and truly foxed.

          29th June     Perfect weather, although somewhat hot for stand by duties.     The Squadron were required to do very little operational flying and so more training flying than usual took place. Apart from some synthetics, the better part of the day was spent acquiring a Squadron tan.

          30th June     To close the month the Squadron escorted No.183 Squadron on two armed shipping reconnaissance sorties. Take off for the first sortie was a rather intrepid affair, taking place at 0500 hours. Nothing was seen except some rocks at the Sept Isles which looked like a convoy of ships, needles to say it wasn't. The second sortie was uneventful with the exception of some flak hurled up at us from Guernsey.

               The closing of the month without an accident has brought the Squadron record to the amazingly high standard of four successive months without an accident.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of June was signed by :- Squadron Leader J. W. Petre.

 

No.276 ( Air Sea Rescue ) Squadron     ' B ' Flight :-

          3rd June     The Squadron disposed of two Defiant aircraft now surplus to re-arming.

          5th June     All ' B ' Flight aircraft were put on stand by at 0445 hours today but were back on normal state at 0545 hours. ( Reasons not given ).

          7th June     A Walrus aircraft of No.276 Air Sea Rescue Squadron escorted by Spitfire aircraft took off from R.A.F. Bolt Head to search for a pilot of No.412 Squadron R.C.A.F. who had baled out North of the Sept Isles. The Walrus landed on the sea and picked up the pilot who had been in his dinghy for eleven hours. They eventually arrived back at R.A.F. Harrowbeer safely. During this rescue operation two Spitfire aircraft of No.276 A.S.R. Squadron flown by Flying Officer Hill ( No.1 ) and Sergeant V. Dorman ( No.2 ) were airborne to locate a dinghy, ( the one from the above rescue that would now be empty ). They arrived as the other aircraft were leaving. Flying Officer Hill instructed Sergeant V. Dorman to close up and he went down to investigate the scene. Flying Officer Hill confirmed that the dinghy was there but found that Sergeant V. Dorman was not in formation but he could be heard transmitting for fixes. Flying Officer Hill could make no contact with him. Sergeant V. Dorman was above the clouds by this time and Flying Officer Hill eventually managed to instruct Sergeant V. Dorman to return to base, which he acknowledged, there was no indication that he was in distress. Flying Officer Hill then flew back to the dinghy to sink it with machine-gun fire and then return to R.A.F. Harrowbeer. On arrival at R.A.F. Harrowbeer Flying Officer Hill found that Sergeant V. Dorman had not returned to base and is therefore posted as missing.

          8th June     The weather was u/s all day today which prevented any search for Sergeant V. Dorman, missing from yesterdays operations.

          9th June     Squadron Leader Mossford, Officer Commanding No.279 Air Sea Rescue Squadron and Squadron Leader Lloyd-Jones, No.19 Group Air Sea Rescue Liaison Officer visited the Squadron Headquarters.

          11th June     It was learnt later today from a reliable source that Sergeant V. Dorman reported as missing on 7/6/1943 had been attacked by six FW190's.

          15th June     Squadron Leader Lloyd-Jones paid another visit to the Squadron today.     Group Captain Barraclough, No.10 Group Senior Administrative Officer and Flight Lieutenant Pushman visited the Station today and had talks with the Squadron Commander in the Mess.          Two Spitfire aircraft of No.276 A.S.R. Squadron and three Hudson aircraft of No.279 A.S.R. Squadron carried out Air Sea Rescue sorties.

          17th June     During the evening two Spitfire aircraft and one Walrus aircraft were airborne on a rescue sortie. The Spitfire located a pilot floating in the sea wearing his ' Mae West ' surrounded by a large patch of oil. A dinghy and a smoke float were dropped, but before the pilot could get into the dinghy the Walrus had arrived, landed on the sea and after three attempts the pilot was picked up. The Walrus was unable to take off owing to the rough sea but a rescue launch soon arrived and the pilot was transferred to it. The Walrus then started to taxi towards the coast and was met by another launch which guided it into Salcombe.

          19th June     Squadron Leader R. F. Hamlyn spoke at Tavistock ( Wings for Victory ) Week with Squadron Leader Bowring and Wing Commander Ward ( Station Commander ).

          21st June     During the afternoon a Walrus aircraft was engaged on practice landings on the sea in Torbay when orders were received to rescue a pilot who had baled out twelve miles East of Berry Head. The Walrus landed and picked him up then flew the recued pilot to R.A.F. Exeter - which was where he was based. The Walrus next returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer.

          24th June     Two Spitfire aircraft were airborne at 1800 hours to locate a sailing boat which had been seen waving a red, white and blue flag. Nothing was sighted. At 2100 hours a Walrus aircraft and two Spitfire aircraft located the sailing boat being orbited by Beaufighter aircraft. Two rescue launches arrived at the scene and the occupants believed to be French were taken on board.

          28th June     At approximately 0725 hours on aircraft from a formation of twelve Flying Fortresses which passed over R.A.F. Harrowbeer landed to re-fuel. The crew reported to No.276 Air Sea Rescue Squadron that two Flying Fortresses had gone in and they gave the approximate positions. A Walrus aircraft and two Spitfire aircraft took off to search for these crews. One of the Spitfires found a Walrus from R.A.F. Portreath orbiting two large dinghies containing the crews, who were later picked up by a rescue launch.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of June was signed by :- Squadron Leader R. F. Hamlyn.

 

No.279 Air Sea Rescue Squadron :-

         9th June     A detachment of No.279 Air Sea Rescue Squadron ( Hudson aircraft ) arrived at R.A.F. Harrowbeer. The Hudson aircraft were equipped with ' airborne lifeboats '.

          15th June     Two Spitfire aircraft of No.276 A.S.R. Squadron and three Hudson aircraft of No.279 A.S.R. Squadron carried out A.S.R. sorties.

          16th June     Two Hudson aircraft of No.279 A.S.R. Squadron carried out A.S.R. sorties.

          20th June     Two Hudson aircraft were airborne at 1300hours to carry out a parallel search for a raft. The aircraft landed at R.A.F. Predannack at 1335 hours. They were airborne again at 1620 hours, nothing was sighted in the search area and the aircraft returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer, landing at 2230 hours.

          21st June     Three Hudson aircraft were detailed out on an A.S.R. sortie. Two rafts were sighted in the sea but no survivors.

          24th June     Two Hudson aircraft on A.S.R. sorties.

          25th June     Two Hudson aircraft were detailed out on an A.S.R. sortie where they sighted a landing barge awash but with no survivors on board. The barge was sunk by gunfire. A raft was also seen but no survivors.

          26th June     Two Hudson aircraft were airborne at 0615 hours on an Air Sea Rescue search for a float carrying three men. The only thing that was sighted was two Destroyers, their position 493N 0715W. The aircraft returned to land at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1259 hours.

          29th June     Two Hudson aircraft of No.279 A.S.R. Squadron along with four Spitfire aircraft, one Walrus aircraft and an Anson aircraft of No.276 A.S.R. Squadron carried out A.S.R. sorties.          One Hudson aircraft took off at 1302 hours on an A.S.R. search. The aircraft picked up an S.O.S. on a bearing of two hundred and three degrees. Nothing was found. The aircraft landed at R.A.F. Harrowbeer at 1514 hours.

          30th June     A Hudson aircraft was airborne at 1114 hours for an Air Sea Rescue search. A  K. G. Class Battleship was sighted on a bearing of one hundred and eighty degrees. Nothing else was sighted. The Hudson returned to R.A.F. Harrowbeer landing at 1750 hours.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of June was signed by :- Wing Commander B. G. Corry  DFC.

 

No.286 ( Army Air Co-operation ) Squadron :-

          24th June     Another unfortunate and fatal accident for the Squadron today.          A Hurricane I aircraft - Serial No.V6725 of the R.A.F. Harrowbeer detachment was engaged on low level attacks of LAA posts in the Plymouth defence are and was observed to nose dive from a low level. The pilot, an Australian Pilot Officer was killed. The aircraft did not catch fire.

               During the month of June No.286 ( AAC ) Squadron carried out ninety one Army Co-operation exercises for No.55 Brigade.     These exercises were undertaken in the Plymouth, Dartmouth, Brixham, Salcombe, Bigbury, Slapton, St. Willows and Gara Point to Start Point areas.     Flying was carried out between three thousand and ten thousand feet for the LAA and HAA consisting of low level, short tows and heavy tows.          The aircraft used were :- two Defiants, Serial Nos.309 and 949, two Hurricanes, Serial Nos.V6725 an 3178 and two Airspeed Oxfords, Serial Nos.134 and 8911.          The Squadron Operation Record Book shows eleven airmen assigned to various flying duties for the month.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of June was signed by :- Flying Officer H. J. Kelly.

 

No.310 ( Czech ) Squadron :-

          3rd June     Three sections of No.310 ( Czech ) Squadron moved to R.A.F. Harrowbeer to act as level escort for an operation.     ( No further details ).

 

No.414 Squadron  R.C.A.F. :-

          1st June     An ' instep ' patrol which had been laid on was cancelled due to bad weather.          Some of the pilots attended at the Intelligence Room and studied aircraft recognition.          No flying was possible all day due to the bad weather.

          2nd June     Late in the evening a signal was received that the Squadron is to move to R.A.F. Portreath. The move to be completed by the 4th June. Seven days doesn't give one time to get bored at a Station.

          3rd June     Six Mustang aircraft carried out an uneventful ' instep ', being airborne for three hours and twenty minutes.          The advance party left by road for R.A.F. Portreath. Packing was speedily completed for the move tomorrow. The Maintenance Section will have to be held here a few days to get the aircraft serviceable.

          4th June     The road and rail party moves were completed by 1300 hours. The convoy went very well considering the difficult types of road, steep hills and sharp bends which necessitated careful handling. Two vehicles were stragglers but arrived within one and a half hours of the main convoy. Settling in at R.A.F. Portreath took longer than usual due mainly to the lack of equipment on the Station.          The pilots and their aircraft had to stay at R.A.F. Harrowbeer due to the bad weather conditions.

The Squadron O.R.B. for the month of June was signed by :- Squadron Leader J. M. Godfrey.

 

 

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Copies of the Station and Squadron Operation Record Books are kept at ' Knightstone House ' -  R.A.F. Harrowbeer Archives ' and are available to view at ' Abigail's at Knightstone ' or by appointment ( Telephone :- 01822 853679     Archivist :- Michael Hayes ).

 
This page is updated each month and only shows the four most current months.


 
Please contact me if you have or want to find out more information regarding the O.R.B.'s and R.A.F. Harrowbeer.
                                                     Thank you     Michael Hayes